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DIY Stompboxes => Building your own stompbox => Topic started by: Valoosj on April 09, 2008, 07:25:31 AM

Title: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Valoosj on April 09, 2008, 07:25:31 AM
Since I can't login to the gallery I have to just post everything here. (any way to acces the layouts gallery? Login I mean and add this tutorial)

Ok , on to the tutorial. First of all, I learned how to do this from ~arph. I just altered one thing in the method. Being the first step.

Take the lid (the bottom part) of your enclosure, and sand down the border on the inside. You know, that really small thingie that keeps the top in place when you close the enclosure.
(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i45/Valoosj/DSC01541.jpg)

Make sure it's completely flat.
(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i45/Valoosj/DSC01539.jpg)

Once you have done that, take your piece of plexi and put your lid on top, fasten it with a piece of duct tape, all the way around.
Then take an iron saw, and cut off the two sides on which there is no tape. Repeat the progress for the two other sides.
Make sure you keep the cut off sides in place, but this should be easy to do. Just be carefull that you don't cut off too much.

Take out your drill, while the tape is still on the lid/plexi and drill the holes for the screws. This way you can be sure that these will fit when assembling the enclosre in the end.
Then take the sanding tool again, and remove the sharp corners, and adjust the size of plexi so that it's exactly the same size as the lid.
(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i45/Valoosj/DSC01542.jpg)

Once that's done, the plexi should not stick out on any side. Try closing it, and see if you're satisfied with the result.
(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i45/Valoosj/DSC01543.jpg)

Once you have finished painting your enclosure, and the pedal is ready for assembly, try to find a spot as close to the centre as possible, and drill a 5mm hole straight through the plexi. Sand your LED so the light comes out of all the sides, hook it up and stick it through the hole.
(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i45/Valoosj/DSC01606.jpg)

Then you're finished!
(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i45/Valoosj/DSC01612.jpg)
(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i45/Valoosj/DSC01615.jpg)
(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i45/Valoosj/DSC01611.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i45/Valoosj/DSC01492.jpg)
(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i45/Valoosj/DSC01494.jpg)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Timebutt on April 09, 2008, 07:29:50 AM
Great work on the article!
Exactly the way I do it too and it's not much work compared to the result :)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Pushtone on April 09, 2008, 07:30:31 AM

Although the filing is easy to do with soft aluminum I thought the idea was to heat up the bottom with an iron and press the plexi in.
The rim on the lid melts the plexi and gets well seated.

At least that what I had in mind.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: demonstar on April 09, 2008, 07:34:12 AM
That is very good! I've never seen that before but now I must give it a go. Good stuff!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Valoosj on April 09, 2008, 07:37:07 AM

Although the filing is easy to do with soft aluminum I thought the idea was to heat up the bottom with an iron and press the plexi in.
The rim on the lid melts the plexi and gets well seated.

At least that what I had in mind.

You don't have to fill up the bottom, there's enough support at the edges. Unless you get a humonguous enclosure off course.
You could iron it, that's the way arph does it, but the plexi might crack then. This way is fast and easy with the right tools.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: jayp5150 on April 09, 2008, 07:38:32 AM
I've never done this, but rather than messing around with duct tape and stuff, couldn't you just drill your screw holes first, and bolt that sucker together, then trim the sides?

Seems like it would alleviate a step, and make cutting more stable.

Then again, I've never attempted it at all, so I don't know. Just a thought.

It is an amazing effect, though.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Valoosj on April 09, 2008, 07:47:49 AM
I've never done this, but rather than messing around with duct tape and stuff, couldn't you just drill your screw holes first, and bolt that sucker together, then trim the sides?

Seems like it would alleviate a step, and make cutting more stable.

Then again, I've never attempted it at all, so I don't know. Just a thought.

It is an amazing effect, though.

You could do this, but be careful. If you don't watch out you might tear a scratch in the side of the enclosure, and if it goes too deep, you'll notice it, even if you paint over it. And I ethed the pedal, so you would definetly have noticed it if I had done it your way.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: iaresee on April 09, 2008, 08:12:48 AM
That is damn cool. You guys make me want to build stuff. I dream in hammond enclosures these days.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: jayp5150 on April 09, 2008, 08:37:41 AM
I've never done this, but rather than messing around with duct tape and stuff, couldn't you just drill your screw holes first, and bolt that sucker together, then trim the sides?

Seems like it would alleviate a step, and make cutting more stable.

Then again, I've never attempted it at all, so I don't know. Just a thought.

It is an amazing effect, though.

You could do this, but be careful. If you don't watch out you might tear a scratch in the side of the enclosure, and if it goes too deep, you'll notice it, even if you paint over it. And I ethed the pedal, so you would definetly have noticed it if I had done it your way.

Good call. I might have to try this soon.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: MikeH on April 09, 2008, 09:21:09 AM
Sweet!  Thanks for the tutorial.  I already took a stab at this and it came out pretty good, but these tips will certainly help me make it perfect!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: soggybag on April 09, 2008, 09:57:07 AM
Thanks for posting this. I may have to give it a try.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Dragonfly on April 09, 2008, 11:41:46 AM
nice job ... VERY  cool tutorial !
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: DougH on April 10, 2008, 03:10:13 AM
Looks pretty cool! Like one of those cars with the neon lights. Now all you need to do is figure out how to install a 15" subwoofer and you'll be good to go. :icon_wink:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: ambulancevoice on April 10, 2008, 03:34:30 AM
to get a gallery post
go login
type in this

user: diyuser
password: j201

there is some links on the side, they should be clear enough

and Andy, heres an idea, you should couple this with swirl paint jobs, but use two multi colored LED spread apart from each other, so the lights blend and make new colours and change all the time, making an ultra trippy pedal
that would be DAMN cool
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: R.G. on April 10, 2008, 04:47:01 AM
One trick I always liked was using plexiglass on the top of the enclosure, lettering on the back side.

Why not glue thin aluminum (0.032"/1mm maybe) to the top of some plexy, and that to the top of your enclosure? Then poke an LED through the top side for a bypass LED and use another that does not go fully through the top aluminum to illuminate the edges. You'd get a bypass indicator that also illuminated the edges of the TOP side. Drill straight through for controls, etc.

Or leave a hole in just the top aluminum and no LED going all the way through. You'd get light out the hole in the aluminum as well as the sides, so you could have the bypass indicator be a patch of light on top instead of being an LED poked through.

As a final thought, there is a version of plexiglass that is specially fabricated for edge lighting. Shine LEDs into the edge, and the whole surface glows. Intended for backlighting signs, etc. So you could have a whole top surface that glows when the effect is active. Or a logo badge, or...

AGH.... gotta stop.... must focus... article deadlines coming...

Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: greigoroth on April 10, 2008, 05:02:01 AM
Time for a question. The sort that indicates that I haven't yet built anything but am obsessed with this idea!

Where do you put the LED? Do you include it in series with the indicator LED (that sticks out the top) in the switching circuit, and then adjust the current limiting resistor to reflect that you have 2 LEDs in series (is that even necessary)?

Also, I had a bit of trouble seeing in the phtos, when drilling the hole for the LED in the plexi do you drill the whole way through and have the LED so that the top sits flush with the bottom of the plexi? (Like in this beautiful drawing below - hope it displays correctly in your respective browsers...)

________   _   ________
                | | |  |
________|  U   |________

Or should it go into the plexi but not all the way through (like this)
                   _  
_______    | |    _____
              |_ U__|
___________________
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Valoosj on April 10, 2008, 05:23:07 AM
My LED goes straight through the plexi, like on the first drawing.
If you want it to indicate bypass, add it to the circuit, if you want it on all the time, then just hook it up to your power supply of the pedal.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: greigoroth on April 10, 2008, 06:09:27 AM
Thanks man!

If you are hooking it up so that it indicates bypass would it be in series with the bypass LED?
Series LED = you add their voltages (yes??) so would this work:

Blue LED: typical voltage 2.8, current 20ma, R=140
2 blue LEDs in series: v=5.6, current =20ma -> R=280???

(sorry for banging on about this!)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: dxm1 on April 10, 2008, 06:20:53 AM
Blue LED: typical voltage 2.8, current 20ma, R=140

I think it'd be more like this:

Blue LED: V = 9 - 2.8 = 6.2v, I = 20ma, R = 310 Ohms
 
Quote
2 blue LEDs in series: v=5.6, current =20ma -> R=280???

V = 9 - 5.6v = 3.4v, I = 20ma, R = 170 Ohms

Quote
(sorry for banging on about this!)

Life is for learning...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: greigoroth on April 10, 2008, 11:44:00 AM
 ;D
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: pietjeekes on June 11, 2008, 08:17:38 AM
well valoosj

thats a nice tutorial you wrote

thx for the tips and help
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on June 11, 2008, 09:18:23 AM
MAKE IT STICKY!!!  :icon_wink:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Derringer on July 06, 2008, 05:53:32 PM
How are you sanding the LED so that the light comes through on all sides?

I just tried sanding a couple LEDs and it only seems to dull the light. i.e. what was once semi-clear plastic has now become very foggy looking plastic.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: CodeMonk on July 06, 2008, 07:02:01 PM
Heres another idea on this subject...
Instead of drilling one hole in the middle with one LED, how about drilling 4 holes, equal distances from the middle, and using different colored LEDs?

Or maybe using a multi colored LED hooked up to a timer?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: jonnyeye on July 06, 2008, 11:08:43 PM
This is a cool idea; thanks for this pics!  What about a bicoloured LED: one colour for effect on, the other for bypass?  Helps you find the thing on a dark stage...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: fryguy on July 07, 2008, 06:12:33 AM
How are you sanding the LED so that the light comes through on all sides?

I just tried sanding a couple LEDs and it only seems to dull the light. i.e. what was once semi-clear plastic has now become very foggy looking plastic.

I could be wrong, because I am still very new to all of this, but I believe that he meant sand down the edges of your LED holder if they block the light from flowing in all directions.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Derringer on July 07, 2008, 07:34:01 AM

 try to find a spot as close to the centre as possible, and drill a 5mm hole straight through the plexi. Sand your LED so the light comes out of all the sides, hook it up and stick it through the hole.
(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i45/Valoosj/DSC01606.jpg)


nah ... no holder ... it looks like the hole is drilled and the LED just sits in there

thanks though
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: fryguy on July 07, 2008, 12:25:16 PM
Whoops, you're right. I have no idea then.  ???
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Valoosj on July 18, 2008, 12:11:15 PM
The led itself is sanded down on the edges so light comes out there instead of only at the top. No led holders. The hole in which it sits is only 5mm, so it's stuck in there pretty tight. Using a bicoloured led is possible, but make sure the led has at least 5000mcd to ensure a good effect. I used a rainbowled once which was pretty nice as well.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Derringer on July 19, 2008, 02:55:11 AM
"sand" as in sandpaper then you're saying? Or a rotary tool?

Only clear led's as well then I'd imagine?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: cpnyc23 on July 19, 2008, 04:52:28 AM
2 questions about this process....

1.  Where does one find plexiglass?  Would the average super-hardware store (ie Home Depot) carry it?

2. How hard is it to cut?   Does a Dremel work well for the task?

Thanks
-Chris
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Hamfist on July 19, 2008, 05:21:58 AM
I think Home Depot has it.  Lowes definitely has it.  I worked at a Lowes for a few months once.  The may have some scraps big enough for a stompbox they'll give you for free.  The store I worked at was cool about that.  They're just going to throw it out anyway.  You could have them rough cut it to close to the right size.  The cutting machine always seemed to be a little off where I worked. 

If you want to cut it yourself, score it with a sharp utility knife, and snap it off.  If you try to cut it with a Dremel cutting wheel, it will melt the plexi, shatter the cutting wheel and send shrapnel and melted plexi bits directly into your eyeball.  Wear eye protection.

Anyway, a decent place that sells plexi should have some scraps to give you to practice on. 

2 questions about this process....

1.  Where does one find plexiglass?  Would the average super-hardware store (ie Home Depot) carry it?

2. How hard is it to cut?   Does a Dremel work well for the task?

Thanks
-Chris

Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: cpnyc23 on July 19, 2008, 11:08:05 AM
 Thanks Hamfist - that's exactly the info I was looking for!!!

-chris
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Valoosj on July 19, 2008, 11:13:54 AM
"sand" as in sandpaper then you're saying? Or a rotary tool?

Only clear led's as well then I'd imagine?

Some rough sandpaper, so the led isn't clear anymore. The only decent result I got was with a clear white and clear blue led. Rating at 5000-6000 mcd.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: CodeMonk on August 05, 2008, 06:39:31 PM
I tried this using a green LED (I have a bunch laying around).
I got noting near the effect, just a faint green spot on each edge.

I take it you are using a super bright LED for this?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: hday on August 05, 2008, 07:11:56 PM
Yeah, you probably need to use a super bright. But if you have a bunch lying around, put one in each corner. Wouldn't be a solid color, but it might give it a smooth fade.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: chicago_mike on August 06, 2008, 12:28:35 AM
I have a Logitech G15 backlit keyboard nd it used multiple square leds for the effect. surrounding the inner order of the keyboard.

the leds dont face down or up into the plexi. The plexi is notched for the led to sit into it.

nifty idea. But I had to replace a couple leds in mine...not the most fun.

What thickness plexi are you guys using? And do you bother buffing the corners after you sand them rounded?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: rrroo on August 06, 2008, 03:50:13 AM
too bad the LED has to be superbright. It would be cool to use clipping LED:s in overdrives like this.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: ~arph on August 06, 2008, 04:12:53 AM
You could always use the light of the clipping leds to trigger an ultrabright led  :icon_wink: using an LDR (as you don't want to tap from the signal line) a voltage divider and a transistor. I'm not sure though if the LDR response is up to par with the clipping freq. it's worth a try if you have the parts laying around...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: liddokun on August 06, 2008, 04:24:16 AM
2 questions about this process....

1.  Where does one find plexiglass?  Would the average super-hardware store (ie Home Depot) carry it?

2. How hard is it to cut?   Does a Dremel work well for the task?

Thanks
-Chris


I cut my plexi with a dremel cutting wheel, and it turned out fine.  The plexi didn't melt signifcantly, just some of the small bits that came off became really warm and soft.  Nothing liquid.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: ~arph on August 06, 2008, 04:31:19 AM
I use a dremel too:

Wear goggles and old clothes.

...seriously

Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: CodeMonk on August 06, 2008, 07:48:51 AM
I use a dremel too:

Wear goggles and old clothes.

...seriously



And one of those dust covers for your face. double seriously :)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: chicago_mike on August 06, 2008, 08:15:20 AM
What thickness plexi do you guys use? :)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Arn C. on August 06, 2008, 09:25:33 AM
I am using 1/4 inch plexi.  I have tried thinner but I like the 1/4 inch better. You can bury most of the led in the 1/4 inch.

Arn C.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: sleepybrighteyez on August 06, 2008, 09:27:57 AM
Ooooooooooh...

Very nice. Very, very nice. How hard would it be to get the plexi LED to vary in brightness based on the guitar signal? Would it be as simple as putting the LED in series with the audio signal path, so varied voltages coming from the guitar vary its brightness? It would be killer to have all my pedals visually reacting to my playing. Bwahahaahahahah!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: CodeMonk on August 06, 2008, 12:24:34 PM
2 questions about this process....

1.  Where does one find plexiglass?  Would the average super-hardware store (ie Home Depot) carry it?

2. How hard is it to cut?   Does a Dremel work well for the task?

Thanks
-Chris


Dremel works fine for fine tuning the size
I did this too.
What I also did was rough cut the plexi, then did the screw mounting holes, then wrapped duct tape around the box.
I then trimmed my plexi with a dremel cutting wheel, and one of the barrel sandng whees. and it turned out fine.  The plexi didn't melt signifcantly, just some of the small bits that came off became really warm and soft.  Nothing liquid.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: ~arph on August 06, 2008, 09:39:35 PM
Ooooooooooh...

Very nice. Very, very nice. How hard would it be to get the plexi LED to vary in brightness based on the guitar signal? Would it be as simple as putting the LED in series with the audio signal path, so varied voltages coming from the guitar vary its brightness? It would be killer to have all my pedals visually reacting to my playing. Bwahahaahahahah!

You'll have to build something called an envelope follower. The signal from the quitar itself is to weak.
A good simple follower for this can be found for example in the nurse quacky (the bottom part of the schematic)

http://www.home-wrecker.com/nurse-quacky.html (http://www.home-wrecker.com/nurse-quacky.html)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Uma Floresta on August 18, 2008, 06:42:10 AM
This is just about the coolest thing ever as far as visuals go.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: sleepybrighteyez on August 18, 2008, 04:33:45 PM
Have you guys seen the acrylic sheets that are supposed to be a replacement for glass? I seen them for the first time this weekend and I wondered if they would work just the same as the plexi-glass used in this project.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: frank_p on August 18, 2008, 05:08:46 PM
Have you guys seen the acrylic sheets that are supposed to be a replacement for glass? I seen them for the first time this weekend and I wondered if they would work just the same as the plexi-glass used in this project.

Do you have more info ?  Plexiglass is an acrylic plastic (Polymethyl methacrylate) and is commonly callec acrylic glass.  You may be refering to the same material.  Depending on the type of acrylic and mean molecular weight, acrylics can have very broad tolerances on mechanical specs.

Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: The Tone God on August 18, 2008, 06:30:36 PM
Be aware that sometimes the term "plexiglass" is used for polycarbonate which is another product.

Andrew
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: frank_p on August 18, 2008, 06:59:01 PM
Be aware that sometimes the term "plexiglass" is used for polycarbonate which is another product.

Andrew

True, i've seen it also ( but not too clear in my mind (not a word game) ).

Anyway, take in account that acrylics is much more prone to crack while making holes, cutting, kicking, etc...
Polycarbonate is very impact resistant and not prone to cracks propagation.  Should also be much more $$$.

Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: The Tone God on August 18, 2008, 08:28:15 PM
True. On the flip side acrylic tends to have better optical characteristics in particular cell cast acrylic although in this case that may not be as important so even extruded should work fine. Also IMHO acrylic tends to have less scratch build up. Polycarbonate tends to collect fine scratches to the point that it starts to make the view milky or cloudy. Once again it may not be much of an issue in this application.

Just a few thoughts.

Andrew
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: frank_p on August 18, 2008, 10:29:04 PM

Just a few thoughts.


But still important in my real work ! :D

Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: sleepybrighteyez on August 19, 2008, 02:31:09 AM
The next time I hit up the hardware store I'll check it out some more. All I remember is that the 'acrylic' is shatterproof, etc.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: cpnyc23 on August 21, 2008, 11:58:32 AM
If you were to scratch the surface (top and bottom) of the plexi... across the whole thing, would that help reflect light better and direct it to the borders?

-chris
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: frank_p on August 21, 2008, 12:03:03 PM
If you were to scratch the surface (top and bottom) of the plexi... across the whole thing, would that help reflect light better and direct it to the borders?

-chris

No, directing the light on the borders are based on refraction (like in optic fibers).  If you scratch the surfaces, part of the light will be redirected in the box and less light will go on the edges. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refraction

 
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Fl!P on August 21, 2008, 01:11:01 PM
I have an idea:

How about putting reflective material on the top and bottom of the plexi instead of scratching it then.
Something like, say, gluing on aluminum foil?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: frank_p on August 21, 2008, 01:24:57 PM

It's better to leave it like that.  The interaction between air and the plastic makes it good.  You would have to put a very reflective thing, like chrome deposition.  Too much trouble for not much gain.  IMO

Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: frank_p on August 21, 2008, 02:39:02 PM
If you were to scratch the surface (top and bottom) of the plexi... across the whole thing, would that help reflect light better and direct it to the borders?
-chris
No, directing the light on the borders are based on refraction (like in optic fibers).  If you scratch the surfaces, part of the light will be redirected in the box and less light will go on the edges. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refraction

Excuses.  Refraction is what is happening before attaining the critical angle.  Then past this angle, you have total internal reflection.  Been a while since I've done optics.  :D

So if you scratch the top and bottom you augment the quantity of light that will go outside of the plastic because you augment the area where the angle of incidence of the light will be less than the critical angle.  So it will go out with an amount of refraction before attaining the edges.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_internal_reflection

You see that you can't see through the surface of the water when you look past the critical point.  Its like if the LED would be the turtle.  :icon_lol:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c0/Total_internal_reflection_of_Chelonia_mydas_.jpg/180px-Total_internal_reflection_of_Chelonia_mydas_.jpg)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: sleepybrighteyez on August 23, 2008, 11:59:51 AM
Ok I checked this stuff out today while I was at Home Depot. I seen the Polycarbonate material, and yes it was much more expensive. It also seemed to have a blue or green tint. What I bought was acrylic plastic (clear). It's 1/8" thick, but they also sell it in 1/4". You can buy small squares as opposed to a sheet as well. I bought about a 12"x16" sheet. I did a quick test with my Minimag shining in from one edge, and it lit up the border fairly well. I think it will look much nicer with an embedded LED. I want to work this into the Fuzz Face build I'm currently working on.

If this rain ever stops I may just be able to finish the paint job, and subsequently the wiring to the jacks and pots.

Do you sand the edge of the plexi with fine steel wool or anything? Or just leave it as is? How does filing the edge of the plexi affect the light?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Franky on August 26, 2008, 11:49:21 AM
Very nice tutorial! It makes a great effect, especially with some RGB (automatic changing) LEDs..

I'm planning to build a Twincaster, and I want to put some RGB LEDs under the tubes sockets, but there is a lot of lighting that leaks out the enclosure, maybe it would work without the LEDs facing the plexi..


Another thing to try: remove a big part of the center of the plexi plate, to get more space in the enclosure..  ;)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: seibertdr on August 27, 2008, 08:12:25 AM

Although the filing is easy to do with soft aluminum I thought the idea was to heat up the bottom with an iron and press the plexi in.
The rim on the lid melts the plexi and gets well seated.

At least that what I had in mind.

You don't have to fill up the bottom, there's enough support at the edges. Unless you get a humonguous enclosure off course.
You could iron it, that's the way arph does it, but the plexi might crack then. This way is fast and easy with the right tools.

what is the pedal that you made and how did you get the different color lights. When do the come on?

Don
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: frank_p on August 27, 2008, 08:41:25 AM

It would be better to file down the "barrier" (as opposed to ironing to melt the barrier in the plastic) as it is an obstacle to light to travel to the sides. No?


Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Franky on August 27, 2008, 09:22:10 AM
Or you can sand it a little to make it shiny, it will reflect the light..
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Valoosj on August 27, 2008, 09:42:44 AM

It would be better to file down the "barrier" (as opposed to ironing to melt the barrier in the plastic) as it is an obstacle to light to travel to the sides. No?




That is one of the first steps on page 1  ;)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: frank_p on August 27, 2008, 10:20:27 AM
That is one of the first steps on page 1  ;)

Yes I know, but it seems that there were not a clear opinion about if it was a good prctice to melt the barrier in in the plastic...
I don't think that it's a good idea.

Maybee I am making too many things at the same time and I am not very concentrated (and this computer is damn slow for topics with pictures).  :D

Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on December 30, 2008, 12:06:08 PM
I made my first border, or at least I tried...I filed the edge of the lid and made a plexi the same size...Cut the plexi, then put it between the lid and the enclosure and drill the holes for the screws, then screw it and used a mouse sander to make it perfect...

Just realized that an Eddystone 1590B isn't that tall, so the 9v battery won't allow me to close it and screw it...
I have to use it on dc-jack-fx only...The next Valvecaster maybe !
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: frank_p on December 30, 2008, 01:02:54 PM
I made my first border, or at least I tried...I filed the edge of the lid and made a plexi the same size...Cut the plexi, then put it between the lid and the enclosure and drill the holes for the screws, then screw it and used a mouse sander to make it perfect...

Just realized that an Eddystone 1590B isn't that tall, so the 9v battery won't allow me to close it and screw it...
I have to use it on dc-jack-fx only...The next Valvecaster maybe !

Adriano,  I wonder if cutting a rectangular hole (with dremel or standrd router) for the battery would work also...  I mean, perhaps you would not get the same light diffusion but you could get an advantage with this method:  you could make this plexi plate a guard to protect the circuit by fixing (with a method I didn't think of yet) it to the hollow part of the box.   It would be a display box for the circuit when you change batteries...  The borders of the hole would also hold the battery where you decide it to be...

just brainstorming...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on December 30, 2008, 01:10:32 PM
Not a bad idea, altough as I said I think I'll use it for a batteryless fx...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: mikemaddux on December 30, 2008, 08:57:29 PM
great tutorial, im gonna have to try it...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Hupla on July 21, 2009, 04:15:02 AM
I was thinking this would be cool for a wah pedal where the light would change colour as you sweep through the bass to treble.

Is there any way of doing this without getting too complicated?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Leston Braun on July 21, 2009, 09:33:15 AM
I was thinking this would be cool for a wah pedal where the light would change colour as you sweep through the bass to treble.

Is there any way of doing this without getting too complicated?

Would it be easiest with a dual-gang pot and few different color LEDs with different enough forward voltages/zeners of different voltage? Connect cathodes to the ground and all anodes to common rail through their own zeners. Then hook the unused side of the wah pot to control the rail voltage, so the LEDs light up one at a time the more you open the wha.

Could additional zeners equivalent to the "next step" LED zener be used to bypass "lower" LEDs when voltage gets high enough, for the LEDs to be lit one at a time?

I should draw a picture of this mess.. even to see for myself would it have even a slight chance of succession.

Drawback would be the pot for normal wah use, haven't seen much wha-design pots which are dual-gang.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Hupla on July 22, 2009, 09:38:42 AM
I was thinking this would be cool for a wah pedal where the light would change colour as you sweep through the bass to treble.

Is there any way of doing this without getting too complicated?

Would it be easiest with a dual-gang pot and few different color LEDs with different enough forward voltages/zeners of different voltage? Connect cathodes to the ground and all anodes to common rail through their own zeners. Then hook the unused side of the wah pot to control the rail voltage, so the LEDs light up one at a time the more you open the wha.

Could additional zeners equivalent to the "next step" LED zener be used to bypass "lower" LEDs when voltage gets high enough, for the LEDs to be lit one at a time?

I should draw a picture of this mess.. even to see for myself would it have even a slight chance of succession.

Drawback would be the pot for normal wah use, haven't seen much wha-design pots which are dual-gang.

Cool. It just sounds like a really interesting thing to do. Instead of the colours changing on a timer.

In your set up, would the last led turn off or stay on as the new one came on?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on July 24, 2009, 04:36:21 AM
My Rebote 2 - thx Yorick for the tutorial...

(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40135&g2_serialNumber=1)(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40137&g2_serialNumber=1)
(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40139&g2_serialNumber=1)(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40141&g2_serialNumber=1)
(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40143&g2_serialNumber=1)(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40145&g2_serialNumber=1)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Hupla on July 24, 2009, 04:40:25 AM
My Rebote 2 - thx Yorick for the tutorial...

(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40135&g2_serialNumber=1)(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40137&g2_serialNumber=1)
(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40139&g2_serialNumber=1)(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40141&g2_serialNumber=1)
(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40143&g2_serialNumber=1)(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40145&g2_serialNumber=1)

Are they all different pedals or are ur LED's changing?

If so how? timer?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on July 24, 2009, 05:41:31 AM
Nah, same pedal and a color changing LED - THIS ONE (http://www.banzaieffects.com/LED-5mm-RGB-multicolor-pr-19402.html)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: EARNEST on August 08, 2009, 04:27:29 AM
Would this mod cause any noise-related issues, since there is an area that is not "noisefree"?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on August 08, 2009, 05:54:59 AM
no noise...that border won't affect the quality of the pedal.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: frequencycentral on August 08, 2009, 06:04:42 AM
Adriano - your Rebote looks ace - I missed it first time aound I think. tell me about the colours changing!


EDIT: Ah, just saw your link to Banzai. Cool!  8)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on August 08, 2009, 06:06:39 AM
I'll see if I can make a video with my gf laptop. Glad you liked Rick - I love this pedal!!!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Jarno on August 08, 2009, 08:58:22 AM
Haven't seen this tutorial before. For a Neutron build, I need a couple more mm's in the enclosure, this will be just the ticket, and look cool to boot! :-)
I will need to make a perspex ring instead of a complete plate, so I don't think I'll get a away with just a single led.
Now, first to get that damned Neutron to work!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on September 09, 2009, 04:09:54 AM
I applied the LED border to my original DOD 308 - now i'ts so cool...
(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40454&g2_serialNumber=3)(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40456&g2_serialNumber=3)
(http://www.aronnelson.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=40458&g2_serialNumber=3)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: ~arph on September 09, 2009, 04:12:10 AM
Very nice!

Everytime I see it I think I have to pick it up again.. I still got loads of plexi in the shed. BTW. is there a good way getting around the problem with the screw lenght? anyone know where to get (online) slightly longer screws that fit the hammond boxes?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on September 09, 2009, 04:23:18 AM
I've never done this, but rather than messing around with duct tape and stuff, couldn't you just drill your screw holes first, and bolt that sucker together, then trim the sides?

Seems like it would alleviate a step, and make cutting more stable.

This is how I do it BTW...First a rough cut (not paul shortino's band!) and then with a mouse sander to make it F L A T!!!

This last one in fact has come up with a challenge - I didn't want to sand the pedal's sides and take off the original paint.
I ended up covering the sides with tape, so only the plexi was exposed to the sander...But I had to be careful not to go thru the tape...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Paul Marossy on September 09, 2009, 11:41:54 AM
I don't think I've come across this thread before. In any case, that looks very cool. But does it make it hard to see the other pedals on your pedal board?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: El Heisenberg on September 09, 2009, 12:07:21 PM
thats cool! Do you buy the plexiglass in peices like that or you gotta cut it yerself? Ya use water clear LEDs or regular ones?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on September 09, 2009, 12:18:24 PM
I am recycling a broken frame of my (now-ex) GF - It has this thin plexi thing instead of glass.
I didn't throw it away, cause I know what to turn it into...As it's thin, I need 3 layers...I rough cut them with a small saw, then place them on the pedal, drill the screw holes and screw the thing down...Then patiently cut all the pieces, starting with some pliers, and then with a mouse sander to get it F L A T to the enclosure sides...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: punkin on September 09, 2009, 04:25:33 PM
Nice stuff as always Adriano.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on September 10, 2009, 12:35:47 AM
Nice stuff as always Adriano.

THX - your avatar pic is so cool, Steph!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: ManCas on September 13, 2009, 02:24:18 PM

Hello! Thanks a lot for the tutorial!

I wanted to use it as an indicator (on/off) but, as I am using the Mill. Bypass, the light was too weak. So I just wired it up tp remain lit.

Crappy pic:

(http://i28.tinypic.com/2rxjonq.jpg)

Cheers

PS: I used just 3 LED's (as you can see), I wonder if using 4 or maybe 6 LED's would look much cooler. Anyway, maybe I'll try that later.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: amptramp on September 13, 2009, 03:55:39 PM
A long time ago, there used to be "colour organs", devices which separated the audio into three frequency bands and lit up a different colour for each band.  It might be possible to add a biquad filter to separate low-pass, bandpass and hi-pass outputs and three rectifier/filter/current amplifiers to drive RGB LED's.  Try stuffing that plus an effect into a 1590A!

This would give an output that changed in colour and intensity with the notes that were being played.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: electrosonic on November 04, 2009, 06:12:28 PM
I have a Radio Shack Engineer's Mini-Notebook, Op Amp IC circuits by Forest Mims III. It has a mini color organ schematic which uses a couple of op amps to drive 3 LEDs for lows, mids and highs.

This is way over my head, but how about taking the signal at the diode clippers and sending it into two divide by ten counters (ie divide by 100) and driving an LED with that. A low E (~80Hz) would flash quite slowly, about every 1.25 seconds the high E string at the 12 fret would flash about 6 times a second.
Andrew.

Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: oliphaunt on November 04, 2009, 11:01:57 PM
I have a Radio Shack Engineer's Mini-Notebook, Op Amp IC circuits by Forest Mims III. It has a mini color organ schematic which uses a couple of op amps to drive 3 LEDs for lows, mids and highs.

Post it please!  ;D
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Hupla on November 05, 2009, 04:07:25 AM
Would it be easy to make a cut along the plexi glass and then snap it off and then sand down, instead of cutting it?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: DUY1337GUITAR on December 28, 2009, 09:26:24 PM
Are the screws that are included with the enclosure long enough to reach from the lid, into the plexi, and into the threaded hole?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: G. Hoffman on December 28, 2009, 10:53:42 PM
Two thoughts on this - though I've never tried it.  

One, if you need longer screws, and can't find them at your local Ace hardware store (mine is remarkable - the only screws I ever can't find are of really odd lengths, or odd materials, such as aluminum nuts so I can use them for router jigs), you can find just about any screw you can imagine at McMaster-Carr.  They also have the single best search engine I've ever seen on a web site.  Go, type "screws" into their search engine, and be amazed.  It's really cool.

Second, I use a lot of Plexiglass (which is a brand name for acrylic, by the way) for jigs/templates/etc. in my day job.  The best way to cut it is to get it close (I usually use a band saw, which is messy and awful; but score and snap works pretty well too, though it is slow), and then cut it to final size with a flush trim router bit.  The big problem with using a Dremel and cut off bit for this is that so much of the bit is in contact with the material that you will always create a lot of heat (then again, I hate Dremel tools.  The only thing they are good for is filling your dumpster!).  The flush trim router bit will give you a better cut, and less of the bit is in contact with the plastic at any one time so you don't create so much heat, which means little or no melting.  Just make sure you have already trimmed the Plexi kind of close to the box - less than the radius of the bit.  Because of the angle on the edge of the box, it is probably a good idea to put a couple layers of masking tape on the sides of the enclosure so you don't eat away any of the aluminum from the box lid.  That said, don't worry too much if you DO bite into the aluminum a bit - any decent router or laminate trimmer will do fine with a light cut on aluminum - just don't go too deep.  Oh, and as always, make sure you push against the rotation of the router.

Also, it's really easy to polish cut plexi - use a blow torch and melt it a bit!  It works great (seriously - that's the right way to do it.  I'm not making that up or anything.  Nothing else works as well!  Just be careful), but you don't want to polish the edges for this purpose because the light needs the "rough" edge to be visible.  Think of it as being kind of like a rear projection movie screen.  Same basic idea.  If the screen were clear, the image would just shine right through it, and you would call it a window.

Oh, and I'm sorry for being such a wordy bastard.  I'm afraid its genetic.


Gabriel
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on December 29, 2009, 02:53:48 AM
Are the screws that are included with the enclosure long enough to reach from the lid, into the plexi, and into the threaded hole?

I made a couple pedals with the border - they are 3mm high and I used the same screws.
If you want a higher border, you have to use longer screws.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: G. Hoffman on December 29, 2009, 02:40:37 PM
I just found some Knightbright right angle SMD LED's that might make for better distribution.  The big problem you are likely to have here (this is the former lighting designer in me speaking) is that LED's typically have a very narrow focus for their light output.  Even the "wide angle" LEDs fall off a lot when you get even a little off axis.  They are getting better, but they are still a problem.  By pointing, say, 4 right angle LEDs towards the edges you are trying to light, you will probably be able to get away with a much lower brightness LED.  Ask me again in a week - I've got some parts on the way.


Gabriel
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: DUY1337GUITAR on December 30, 2009, 08:27:35 AM
Alright, thanks for the reply.  I think a 3mm border would work, my friend's wanting me to build a Dr. Boogey for him.  This is going to be fun :)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: G. Hoffman on January 25, 2010, 06:02:28 PM
I was working on one of these, and I thought I'd show an easier way to trim the plexi to size.

First, cut it to rough size:

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4016/4304999061_7783a1a0f8.jpg)


Screw everything together.  The piece of wood in there is because the lid of the box was just a bit too thin for the router bit, because there is a gap between the router and the bearing.

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2764/4305001499_163cb67ebb.jpg)


I was going to use a flush trim bit, which has the bearing on the end of the bit, but because of the slopped sides of the box it would have been a pain.  So, I used this pattern bit, and used the lid as my template - hence the need for the wood.

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4042/4305746752_861de69b6c.jpg)


And after everything was trimmed.

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4058/4305006241_9ca039cb12.jpg)


The whole thing took maybe 15 minutes of actual work, and the plexi doesn't melt at all.


Gabriel
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: chicago_mike on March 23, 2010, 08:58:45 PM
I'm in the process of amking 4 borders for some effects and its going well.

But the idea of the colour organ acting as the border is just too kitschy to pass up! I can't find a schematic for such a thing however. Can anybody post one? :)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: mikemaddux on March 23, 2010, 10:36:51 PM
I'm in the process of amking 4 borders for some effects and its going well.

But the idea of the colour organ acting as the border is just too kitschy to pass up! I can't find a schematic for such a thing however. Can anybody post one? :)

+1
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: space_ryerson on March 24, 2010, 08:24:58 AM
I really thought I had some schematics for color organs laying around, but I'm having trouble finding them. I did have this in my bookmarks:

http://www.electronicpeasant.com/projects/ledlamps/ledcolor.html (http://www.electronicpeasant.com/projects/ledlamps/ledcolor.html)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: chicago_mike on March 24, 2010, 10:09:54 AM
I found a bunch but nothing for leds...only with lightbulbs and a 120 volt source.. :-\
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: chicago_mike on March 24, 2010, 10:11:24 AM
I saw that one too, but for even just 3 leds, looks like overkill... but I could be wrong.

Unless I surface mount the entire thing.  :icon_idea:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: neurino on March 24, 2010, 10:17:11 AM
Today I started my own try, I found 2mm thickness plexi (4mm was available too but didn't want to change screws).

I found that engraving with a cutter and cutting like glass, with a little pressure and a little luck, is the best way. Then just a little file work is needed.

To remove the lid inner border I used a hacksaw since using a file took too much time.

As a led I'm tryin' one of these 10mm ultrabright leds (http://www.goodwillsales.com/blue-10000mcd-10mm-waterclear-p-1434.html?osCsid=c082a1bf303ff5c338cd23d18708a3a8) with an aluminium foil on the bottom.
I don't make the led go through (it has a little diffusion angle, less than 20%) but made a half-hole with the drill bit, something like a concave lens.

Now I wonder if, wrapping the led and the plexy with aluminium foil I could maximize the amount of light routed on the border, something like this:
(http://s3.postimage.org/fJ8Tr.jpg) (http://www.postimage.org/)

Any scientific explanation is welcome too!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: space_ryerson on March 24, 2010, 12:36:26 PM
I saw that one too, but for even just 3 leds, looks like overkill... but I could be wrong.

Unless I surface mount the entire thing.  :icon_idea:
Oh, I agree that's overkill. I'm sure something much more simple could be worked out.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: neurino on March 25, 2010, 03:22:59 AM
I got a couple of works done:

(http://s3.postimage.org/hD9cr.jpg) (http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=PqhD9cr) (http://s3.postimage.org/hDbHA.jpg) (http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=PqhDbHA) (http://s3.postimage.org/hDgGS.jpg) (http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=PqhDgGS)
(http://s3.postimage.org/hC_dS.jpg) (http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=PqhC_dS) (http://s3.postimage.org/hD1J0.jpg) (http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=PqhD1J0) (http://s3.postimage.org/hD6Ii.jpg) (http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=PqhD6Ii)

The green one is a 5mm wide angle 2000mcd 20mA led,
the blue one a single 10mm 10000mcd 20mA 10mm

The green one is brighter than the blue, don't know if 'cause it's smaller or the wide angle led is better...

Again to cut plexy I made holes before then put it between lid (after removing the inner border) and enclosure, firmly closed with screws, engraved with a cutter both sides following the border, then broke with a little pressure (also with the help of a pair of pliers). After that only a little file is necessary.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: walker on March 25, 2010, 08:08:05 AM
this is such a cool idea!  glad I saw this thread.   After scoring/cutting the plexi, what grit sandpaper are people using?   and what kind of file is best to remove the inner border?  Good source for wide angle and right angle LED's?  Where to get longer screws with the correct thread?  If I use a bi-colored led for bypass/on indicator, how would I wire that? 
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: chicago_mike on March 25, 2010, 10:06:18 AM
For fine sanding I think emory paper / cloth should be fine, sand in one direction only, like planing a door. :)

Mouser and everybody else should carry 1000MCD or higher, 50000 , 10000MCD leds. :) Or ebay.

And go to Home Depot or Menards, a big menards, and youll see a good screw section with sliding drawers and such and you can then get the longer size.

I dont think the screws are normal 8/32 or 10/32 but they are dang close enough so a hardware store, even ACE sould have those. :)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: knealebrown on April 12, 2010, 08:52:35 AM
Just as an update for all those in the U.K.

I found this company that will cut plexi to size meaning that you only have to do some minor sanding eg rounding the corners.

Heres the link.

http://www.acrylic-online.co.uk/product_list.php?id=20

delivery is 8 for U.K (which is not great but not bad either) but the plexi is cheap, less than one pound for a cut peice for all standard pedal size pieces. Also they do loads of different colours and thicknesses just incase you want something larger/smnaller or dont want to use it on a LED border. Im ordering from them tonight and will let y'all know what the product is like when i get it.

I see this as being a fairly good deal as B&Q charge like 30 a square meters worth.

Kneale
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: chicago_mike on April 24, 2010, 02:08:05 AM
A precaution. Some clear plastics hold a static charge. I am using Lexan wich doesnt. I think the cost is about the same. :)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: tasos on November 04, 2010, 09:13:10 AM
hohoo imagine that bottom flashing with the rate of a tremolo or flanger!!!! ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D :icon_twisted:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: ~arph on November 04, 2010, 10:40:20 AM
That is the first pedal this was ever used on, a tremolo with flashing bottom  ;D
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: tasos on November 04, 2010, 12:03:34 PM
we want the video!and we want it now!!!!!! :icon_razz: :D :D :D :D
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: mth5044 on November 04, 2010, 12:45:57 PM
Somebody could make a killing selling these for some of the standard boxes.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Earthscum on November 04, 2010, 05:52:13 PM
I curse you, Yorick... you just solved a problem and figured out how I can make my GF's Little Angel even more pretty... now I have more work to do!

I can't complain, though... I love it. I have some plexi I've been getting ready to play with anyways, and this is even simpler than what I was gonna do (equivalent of fretboard inlay work, cuz I like to geek out like that).

Thanks a bunch for the tutorial! And don't worry... it's a curse for good karma... not all curses are bad!  ;D
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on November 04, 2010, 10:28:46 PM
Somebody could make a killing selling these for some of the standard boxes.

yeah they could, problem is the inner lip  of the base has to be filed first to lie flat...

ive done it to a few of my pedals...looks great..well worth the extra effort...

(http://dl.dropbox.com/u/7464107/P150610_21.36.jpg)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: ~arph on November 04, 2010, 10:44:33 PM
And the other problem is that you need longer screws..
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: tasos on November 04, 2010, 10:53:52 PM
any hardware store will probably havE! :icon_razz: :icon_razz:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: ~arph on November 04, 2010, 11:04:13 PM
Nah I always found the screw sizes tricky, they are in inches, not mm. So in europe it's a bit harder. There is also a difference between the screws in a B and a BB.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: tasos on November 04, 2010, 11:38:51 PM
i am sure you will find something out!try skateboard screws!the come in pack of 8 to hold the trucks the metal part and the board together...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on November 04, 2010, 11:40:01 PM
i used thin perspex not the thick stuff...no problem with the screws....

and a lot easier to cut n file...much quicker too...

i got my perspex from a pound shop, just bought a couple of cheap picture frames...thin thin thin...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: amptramp on November 05, 2010, 08:57:16 AM
Nah I always found the screw sizes tricky, they are in inches, not mm. So in europe it's a bit harder. There is also a difference between the screws in a B and a BB.

The Hammond 1550 has stainless metric screws whereas the 1590 has 6-32 North American standard screws.  Now if we could get metric stainless easily...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: ~arph on November 05, 2010, 11:12:25 PM
Haha it's the north american standard size that is difficult to get for me
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: pjohns0 on September 08, 2011, 05:09:29 AM
Would it be possible to use an LED border when using Millenium 1 switching?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on September 08, 2011, 05:42:41 AM
Millenium 1 is used to drive the LED on and off - why shouldn't it work?! I made mine using the millenium 2.
After all, it's just the LED not in its bezel but in the plexi!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on September 08, 2011, 06:02:33 AM
^ yep!..

i just had an led wired to the 9v socket, on all the time...and an on/off led...i never use batts though... :icon_wink:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: pjohns0 on September 08, 2011, 06:38:08 AM
Sorry, Renegadrian.  I wasn't all that clear in my question.  I would want to incorporate 2 LEDs, one On/Off LED on the top of the enclosure as normal and also one on/off LED on the light border.
Not sure if I can draw the current of two LEDs and use the Millenium 1 bypass?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: rockhorst on September 12, 2011, 12:09:40 AM
Just noticed: there are now prefab light emitting borders on sale in Arons store! Does anybody know if it is still necessary to sand/file down the aluminum rim? I suspect so, which would be a pity (that's what kept me from doing it so far). Either way, cool product still!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on September 12, 2011, 12:28:33 AM
^  nope you don't have too...it sits on it by the looks of it.... ;)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: The Tone God on September 12, 2011, 07:38:07 PM
Just noticed: there are now prefab light emitting borders on sale in Arons store! Does anybody know if it is still necessary to sand/file down the aluminum rim? I suspect so, which would be a pity (that's what kept me from doing it so far). Either way, cool product still!

No you do not have to modify the case in anyway. The plates have a channel that the rim fits into so there is no need to remove the rim.

Andrew
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: rockhorst on September 12, 2011, 08:16:26 PM
Ubersweet!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: iPop on September 18, 2011, 05:13:36 AM
wow cool stuff!!:D

but i have a question  :icon_redface:: i'm new on diy and i don't know how and where to connect the second led; i mean: can i connect it directly to the switch? or is it better to connect in parallel with the other led? does the parallel connection need any change of the resistor's value?

thank you for helping me :D

bye,
Francesco
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: tasos on September 18, 2011, 05:49:37 AM
wow cool stuff!!:D

but i have a question  :icon_redface:: i'm new on diy and i don't know how and where to connect the second led; i mean: can i connect it directly to the switch? or is it better to connect in parallel with the other led? does the parallel connection need any change of the resistor's value?

thank you for helping me :D

bye,
Francesco
You will have to use two leds and two resistors
This is what you need

     ->resistor->led->ground
9v
     ->resistor->led->ground
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: iPop on September 19, 2011, 12:47:46 AM
well thank you!! :D

i have another question: has anyone tried different thickness of plexiglass? what is the best?

thank you again :D
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on September 19, 2011, 12:53:14 AM
ive used much thinner stuff, easier to work with etc...no screw depth problems either...

from cheapo pound shop picture frames... :)

http://www.youtube.com/user/100roberthenry?feature=mhum#p/u/21/cfoSck073gU
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Gordo on September 19, 2011, 07:23:39 AM
Quick note on the premade ones.  I ordered a B and BB sized one to see what they looked like.  I thought they were kinda pricey but got a couple anyway.  I got them a few days ago and I take back the pricey bit.  These are really nicely made with a routed slot for the bottom plate and even the TTG logo lasered into the plastic.  The only thing you have to do is drill the mounting holes (new screws are provided) and any hole(s) necessary for LED(s).

Very nice.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: sewage666 on November 28, 2011, 07:19:10 AM
Lurking on this one for awhile. My first work was to take my old Phase 90 and add the border so I wouldn't have to drill the box (though someone else had already drilled the back for power)...
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-C6DMpUkhzts/TlPPP3sgTvI/AAAAAAAAAHE/x3nJTaFn55A/s400/photo1.jpg)

My friend liked that so much, he wanted me to add lights to his precious HM-2.
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-wl2I4yg80pY/TtE03cxlAlI/AAAAAAAAAXU/SOTn0hhkFrQ/s1600/IMG_5426.jpg)

In trade, I'm getting his old iPhone 4. So, thanks for a mil, or maybe $200, for the idea!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Renegadrian on November 28, 2011, 07:52:15 AM
old iphone 4 for a light border?! man, would he give you his girlfriend if you ever build him a whole pedal?!  :icon_surprised:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Psychotronic on January 25, 2012, 01:25:19 PM
Alright, I'm a n00b when it comes to this stuff, but I'm giving it a try. I lowered the value of the CLR for the existing LED to 1k, but it's still not bright enough, and I'm using a high brightness water-clear 5mm orange LED. I haven't sanded the LED because I'm not exactly sure how to do that. How exactly do I sand, which part do I sand, which part do I NOT sand? Thanks.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on January 25, 2012, 11:11:27 PM
hi psycho....and welcome!.

heres what i did, sand the top of the led flat...but not right down to the inner bits ok.....and sand the sides this spreads the light better..

try dropping your led resistor as low as possible...maybe 470r/ even 220r....
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Psychotronic on January 26, 2012, 04:54:47 AM
Sand the top FLAT! Wow, ok, I'll give it a shot. And I'll lower the CLR again. Thanks!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Psychotronic on January 26, 2012, 10:20:35 AM
Hmm...an interesting result, and not what you'd expect: I had the CLR @ 1k, and the LED would blink until the rate knob was at either min or max, then it would stay lit. Turning the pedal off and then on would reset it.

Lowered the CLR to 100k, and the LED would not work at all.

Raised the CLR to 680k, and the LED would flash very brightly for a split-second, then stay lit.

Please note that this is a BYOC trem whose LED is set to blink along with the trem rate.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: pedaljunkie on February 06, 2012, 08:52:24 AM
Hey guys, I'm fairly new here as well, and I've read through this a couple times now and my only question is this...  are you wiring the LED for the plexi to the 3PDT switch?   (if you want to use it to show on/bypass)  If so, could someone post a typical wiring diagram with the added LED wiring for the plexi?  (I know there are quite a few ways to wire a switch)  It would be tremendously helpful.


Thanks
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on February 06, 2012, 10:07:10 PM
hi and welcome...

you can either wire to switch as in a normal on/off indicator..but on base...

http://gaussmarkov.net/wordpress/thoughts/wiring-up-a-1590b/

or wire switch with led as normal and wire another led for the base which will be on all the time too...9v> resistor>led+..led -  to ground... ;)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: pedaljunkie on February 07, 2012, 03:06:53 PM
Cool!  thanks for the link.  really helpful in deciphering different 3PDT wirings.  Also, thanks for clarifying the different ways to hook up the base/plexi LED.

Last question.  I am wondering if possible/how to hook up a bi-color LED (3 leg) so that the light base is wired constantly on (when pedal is bypassed (lets say RED) until switching the effect on in which case it would change colors to say green. 

Do able?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on February 08, 2012, 12:39:59 AM
bi colour leds are not bright enough imo..well the ones i have anyway...


you could do this though!...

have your base led (say green) on all the time...

and wire 2 other colour leds for your on/off in series...but lowering the resistor too...(around 220r maybe - experiment)..and having one led on top...and one in the base too...

thats what i would do, the choice of the 'blended' base colours is up to you....try them out first.. :icon_cool:

you could have green near the front, blue at the back...of the base.. ;)

green is always brightest imo..... ;)
http://www.diystompboxes.com/smfforum/index.php?topic=66840.msg741130#msg741130
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: pedaljunkie on February 08, 2012, 02:46:42 PM
Thanks again!  So many ideas to try!  Your pedals in the video and pictures look killer!  I like the additive LED color idea... maybe bright white for always on and green to blend in once the effect is on!  Pretty cool! 

So if I have this right...  I would wire the on/off LEDs in series with ONLY 1  current limiting resistor (lowered value for both LEDs) .  Now the link you showed me has the CLR on the LED's cathode connecting to lug 4 of the switch... other diagrams show the CLR on the anode of the LED between it and the 9V jack lug.  Is one way better than the other?  Seems like the cathode approach is more popular... or I read a diagram wrong!   :icon_lol:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on February 08, 2012, 10:48:03 PM
cool idea white, then colour blend..nice..

yep 1 resistor for 2 leds in series...breadboard the leds with a resistor to find a good brightness on 9v...

resistor can go on either, but i prefer to put it on the positive side for protection.... ;)   
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: pedaljunkie on April 16, 2012, 09:20:49 AM
I used a few of the light boards on sale in the store here and they worked very well!  I loved the results!  Does anyone know if the store will be selling the larger sized 1590BB boards anymore?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: The Tone God on April 16, 2012, 11:01:19 AM
We have gotten a few emails about these. For the record we will make them as long as people want them. They will not be discontinued anytime soon so no one should fear. As for out of stock you can always send Aron a polite email or a message in the "Store" forum poking him for more. ;)

Andrew
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: pedaljunkie on April 16, 2012, 11:27:59 AM
Thanks Andrew!  Much appreciated!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: chromesphere on April 16, 2012, 03:45:05 PM
I recently made a light plate and used dead astronauts "sound to light" board which looks pretty cool, the border flashing with the output of the delay.

I'm going to do a video tutorial on building a lightplate at some stage. Its not rocket science but there are a few tips i could share.  Might save you breaking 3 plates like i did lol.  I've made one with the backplate and one without (this one).  I left the backplate off this one to give it a sort of "PC Modding" look :D

Heres a couple of videos of the build. Hope you like.

Paul

Build Report:



Sound Demo:



Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: kato on June 15, 2012, 01:17:03 PM

Thanks Chromes, I get a lot out of your tutorials so I appreciate all the work you put into them.

I'm adding this to the long list of things to try, along with etching an enclosure, etc...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: chromesphere on June 16, 2012, 03:42:17 PM
No problem Kato, glad you liked it!  I reckon the light border would look pretty cool on a tremolo or phaser with LFO led's etc as well.
Paul
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: rockhorst on August 02, 2012, 05:51:25 AM
Question: I just got a 3mm plexi plate in the shape of a wah shell. It has four holes evenly spaced down the center line (I was guessing, hoping this would be a good configuration). I sanded down the sides of a blue LED (since they tend to be the brightest anyway) but that didn't really do anything. Neither did sanding the top flat. Most of the light is still directed forward. There is of course some light coming out of the sides, but it's not really a 'light emitting border', more like a simmer :P.

Suggestions? Lights around the rim instead of hoping to trap it from the center of the plate? Some other LED configuration? Should the plexi sides be smooth or is diffuse/sanded better?

Edit: just tried it with the bottom plate on, hoping for some reflections, but that didn't improve it much (a little though).
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on August 02, 2012, 05:53:30 AM
go for diffused...light sanding should be better.. :)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: rockhorst on August 05, 2012, 11:34:50 PM
I'm trying to get this to work and have been re-reading the first few pages for a few times now...I still don't get the sanding of the LED part. I've tried it with bright blue LEDs but it hardly matters. The light produced by the LED is aimed full forward and not much strays off to the sides. So how will sanding the outside of the LED help produce more light along the edges? Just doesn't make sense to me at the moment...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Skrogh on August 06, 2012, 12:24:54 AM
Because the shell of the LED will then become diffuse, and instead of focusing the light, it will spread it. (At least to some degree)
Make sure to scratch the outside of the LED as much as possible, or use a diffuse one (you can get LEDs with a milky-white shell)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: StarGeezers on August 06, 2012, 01:24:16 AM
  Anybody tried putting reflective material across the broad unseen areas to reflect/ focus the light to the edges??   Maybe just some tin foil ?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: CodeMonk on August 06, 2012, 02:55:34 AM
  Anybody tried putting reflective material across the broad unseen areas to reflect/ focus the light to the edges??   Maybe just some tin foil ?

Yeah I tried.
Didn't do shit for me.
But then again, I only really tried it once and didn't put much effort into it.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: rockhorst on August 06, 2012, 03:03:41 AM
I'm trying to get it to work for a wah shell...did some experimenting and it's kinda funny: you get the front and the back side of the border lit up pretty easily, even by a LED dead in the middle. But you hardly get any light from the sides. I guess it's got something to do with the corners.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Gurner on August 06, 2012, 04:42:04 AM
Because the shell of the LED will then become diffuse, and instead of focusing the light, it will spread it. (At least to some degree)
Make sure to scratch the outside of the LED as much as possible, or use a diffuse one (you can get LEDs with a milky-white shell)

For a typical high brightness 3mm/5mm led, the issue is that the LED lenses are manufactured in such a way as to narrow the beam into a very tight directional focus (from recollection something like a 15 degree angle), diffusing the lens by sanding it can only help a little (cos the lens underneath is still tightly focusing the light into a relatively fine pin prick).

Flat top leds have a wider angle of 'light spread' (but then again they look weaker...there's a reason high brightness leds look intensely bright!). SMD leds have about 120 degree of spread...but even then, thery're only going to be effective if you can physically mount the leds back from the acrylic border. (ie if you mount the leds at the edge of the acrylic, you'll still get more of a pin pricks of light vs diffused light)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: rockhorst on August 06, 2012, 06:16:29 AM
Gurner makes my point...although comparison shows that sanding helps a bit. But I can't really get a good illumination of the sides and I have to really really push the blue LEDs, so I imagine they won't have a very long lifetime...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: toomanypies on August 16, 2012, 01:33:55 PM
Hello, I stumbled upon this thread and it cast me back to my first build. Thought someone else might like to try this...LEDs under the knobs:

                                 >>>>>>    http://i1048.photobucket.com/albums/s366/billyblanks3/5ef9ce0e.jpg    <<<<<<
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on August 18, 2012, 11:01:31 PM
^ more info on that?.... ;)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: toomanypies on August 19, 2012, 07:16:42 PM
Sure. It uses the same sort of principle as the LED border. There are two clear plastic rings, each about half a mm thick, one under each knob, and the underside of each knob is lined with tin foil. I used two blue 3mm LEDs and each one is partly inserted (from inside the box) into a small hole (roughly 2mm) I drilled under each knob. I had to use mini pots, otherwise the holes would be visible outside the edges of the knobs. When powered, enough light makes it up through the hole to be reflected through the plastic, and by the tin foil. In reality the effect is more subtle than my camera suggests, not so OTT.

Great forum! I never thought I'd say this, but I now have Stompbox Fever  :icon_twisted:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: haveyouseenhim on August 20, 2012, 12:13:57 AM
I'm making an orange squeezer at the moment and I'm definitely going to use a some acrylic i have left over from making this DOD OD 250. And maybe if i can find some clear knobs i could put some leds under them.

(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/DSC07625.jpg)
(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/DSC07627.jpg)
(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/DSC07628.jpg)

And this is a lil amp i made where the border flashes with the bass.

(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/1330252616098-1.jpg)
(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/1329805117468.jpg)
(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/1329805624116.jpg)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on August 20, 2012, 10:36:37 PM
@toomanypies:  cool cheers for that...and welcome!.. ;) :icon_cool:

@mike:  that looks nuts...in a cool way...love the biohazard too....must've been a pig cutting that stuff though... :)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: haveyouseenhim on August 21, 2012, 12:54:25 AM
^ Thanks. Here's the sister amp.

(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/DSC07629.jpg)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on August 21, 2012, 01:08:04 AM
nice!... :icon_cool:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: toomanypies on August 21, 2012, 10:06:36 AM
Thanks for the welcome deadastronaut. Here's a picture I managed to scrounge up:

(http://i1048.photobucket.com/albums/s366/billyblanks3/92b9acf6.gif)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on August 21, 2012, 01:52:43 PM
^ that looks great... :icon_cool: :icon_cool: :icon_cool:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: haveyouseenhim on August 21, 2012, 07:55:42 PM
I had some enclosures come in the mail today, so I'm working on the Orange Squeezer at the moment.

(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/DSC07632.jpg)
(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/DSC07633.jpg)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: haveyouseenhim on August 23, 2012, 06:53:33 PM
The orange squeezer is coming along nicely.

(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/DSC07634.jpg)

Here's the decal I'm going to use.

(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/DSC07635.jpg)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on August 24, 2012, 11:12:10 PM
thats coming along nicely.....cool decal too. :icon_cool:

thats some chunky perspex (in the UK we call it that) your using...

i used much thinner stuff as i didn't want to use/find longer screws etc...plus i like the sleek thin look of it...

cheesey vid alert... :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfoSck073gU&feature=plcp


Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: haveyouseenhim on August 25, 2012, 12:09:00 AM
I figure it will be alright being that thick. It's going to be the power indicator, so it's a good thing that it's thick. It's going to be super bright. I'm going to use 2 super bright white leds on it. The acrylic I'm using fluoresces when light hits it.

It's got its last clear coat drying right now, so I should have finished pics tomorrow or Sunday.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: haveyouseenhim on August 25, 2012, 01:21:15 PM
I'ts done!!!!!!

(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/DSCN2732.jpg)
(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/DSCN2734.jpg)
(http://i1267.photobucket.com/albums/jj545/haveyouseenhim/DSCN2737.jpg)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on August 25, 2012, 02:12:26 PM
^ cool, looks really bright...
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Pyr0 on September 01, 2012, 12:29:54 PM
That Orange Squeezer is really nice Mike, where do you get that acrylic (perspex) from ?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: haveyouseenhim on September 01, 2012, 02:12:05 PM
It came off of a cell phone display at some store.   Reduce reuse recycle :)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: lynessmy on April 02, 2013, 10:21:59 PM
Anyone can share the size of the Arcrylic cut out for 1590A and 1590B enclosure?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on April 03, 2013, 12:23:55 AM
draw around it... ;)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: pappasmurfsharem on August 02, 2013, 09:30:16 AM
This may have been discussed but I couldn't see it.

If I wanted the boarder to light up with the clipping on a distortion/overdrive build I assume I could just put one of the LEDs from the clipping section into the plexiglass, but what about typical silicon diodes?

I would kind of like how it to go bright and slowly dim as the notes decayed.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: Digital Larry on August 02, 2013, 06:22:28 PM
This may have been discussed but I couldn't see it.

If I wanted the boarder to light up with the clipping on a distortion/overdrive build I assume I could just put one of the LEDs from the clipping section into the plexiglass, but what about typical silicon diodes?

I would kind of like how it to go bright and slowly dim as the notes decayed.

If you had an extra op amp section I'd put a peak follower on it with a cap large enough to extend it out and then drive it from the input.  But I don't know... do LEDs in clipping circuits flash?
Title: Re: Re: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: pappasmurfsharem on August 02, 2013, 08:29:44 PM
This may have been discussed but I couldn't see it.

If I wanted the boarder to light up with the clipping on a distortion/overdrive build I assume I could just put one of the LEDs from the clipping section into the plexiglass, but what about typical silicon diodes?

I would kind of like how it to go bright and slowly dim as the notes decayed.

If you had an extra op amp section I'd put a peak follower on it with a cap large enough to extend it out and then drive it from the input.  But I don't know... do LEDs in clipping circuits flash?

They do in my CJOD but I've read they don't always flash. I think it'd be interesting to have them light up because when I watch them in the overdrive they go from bright and slowly decay down. But not real bright
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: haveyouseenhim on August 03, 2013, 04:37:02 AM
This may have been discussed but I couldn't see it.

If I wanted the boarder to light up with the clipping on a distortion/overdrive build I assume I could just put one of the LEDs from the clipping section into the plexiglass, but what about typical silicon diodes?

I would kind of like how it to go bright and slowly dim as the notes decayed.

Take a look at deadastronaut's 'sound to light' circuit. It isn't exactly the clipping LEDs lighting up, but it seems like it would be perfect for what you want.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: amptramp on August 03, 2013, 12:37:12 PM
Be aware that if you allow ambient to hit a clipping diode, it will modulate the signal,  If the light source happens to be noisy, like a fluorescent, that will be superimposed on the signal.  We once made an experimental touch panel using LED emitters and LED's as photodiodes and we found that the leakage current in LED's exposed to light was rather high but the concept worked - just not well enough for our purpose (which was to design an optical touch panel operating in the green where it would not be as affected by ambient light as one operating in the infrared), because the leakage doubles for every 10C rise in temperature and it was a bit marginal at room ambient.
Title: Re: Re: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: pappasmurfsharem on August 03, 2013, 02:56:56 PM
Be aware that if you allow ambient to hit a clipping diode, it will modulate the signal,  If the light source happens to be noisy, like a fluorescent, that will be superimposed on the signal.  We once made an experimental touch panel using LED emitters and LED's as photodiodes and we found that the leakage current in LED's exposed to light was rather high but the concept worked - just not well enough for our purpose (which was to design an optical touch panel operating in the green where it would not be as affected by ambient light as one operating in the infrared), because the leakage doubles for every 10C rise in temperature and it was a bit marginal at room ambient.

Is there a way to feed of the clipping diodes without harming their function?

To somehow have them drive another led?
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: duck_arse on August 04, 2013, 05:51:00 AM
you could always shine the clipper leds at an ldr in an opamp feedback path, you might work it to drive indicating leds.
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: J0K3RX on August 04, 2013, 07:33:11 AM
I am sure you guys have seen these? You can put a 3mm LED in the backside and the shaft lights up.. use clear knobs etc..
http://www.smallbearelec.com/servlet/Detail?no=1186
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: mrsmash23 on October 01, 2014, 08:10:16 AM
Thanks guys for this cool mod! Had to mod my wah pedal  :)

Used 4 LEDs, 1 in the middle of each side. First time I failed with 3mm red LEDs, very weak light. Next time I used 5mm clear red LEDs (Tayda: LED 5mm Red Water Clear Ultra Bright, SKU: A-706), used sandpaper on them and finally satysfying result  :icon_twisted: It doesn't look effective on photo, but it is quite strong in real life.

(http://i.imgur.com/D11vBPl.jpg)

Short video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5-T480N-hM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5-T480N-hM)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: deadastronaut on October 01, 2014, 01:50:49 PM
^ nice.. 8)
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: chicago_mike on October 03, 2014, 09:49:28 AM
Now you need a stacked pot....Why??

To control the brightness of the LEDs as you press up and down on the treadle.  :icon_mrgreen: :icon_twisted:
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: aab0mb on October 03, 2014, 04:45:08 PM
Now you need a stacked pot....Why??

To control the brightness of the LEDs as you press up and down on the treadle.  :icon_mrgreen: :icon_twisted:

This can be done with the scratchless opto wah conversion.  In my build I choose to have just one indicator led that varies brightness with the pedal movement.  More subtle as is my taste.  Still used the lighted base plate for on off indicator function.  I may have the highest current draw of any wah pedal in the world! Lot's of LEDs in there.   haha
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: duck_arse on October 04, 2014, 05:08:15 AM
so once you've got the treadle connected to a voltage divider, there is nothing except good taste preventing you from adding an LM3915 or 6 and a stack of leds, so the whole thing gets brighter or differently coloured or progresses around the treadle etc.

nothing, you hear?!
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: andrew.g.r.holmes on September 01, 2016, 11:07:12 AM
FYI, came across a link to this topic by way of a patent application! See: https://patents.google.com/patent/US20160063976A1/ for someones attempt to patent "Enclosure with windows for audio effects and guitar pedals"
Title: Re: Light Emitting Border tutorial
Post by: ~arph on September 01, 2016, 09:48:46 PM
Hahahaha, that is like trying to patent a house with windows installed