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DIYstompboxes.com  |  DIY Stompboxes  |  Building your own stompbox  |  An idea 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: An idea  (Read 2565 times)
Ed G.
Posts: 767


An idea
« on: September 01, 2003, 08:06:37 PM »

I had always thought it'd be a good idea to make some sort of direct box, a sort of a speaker simulator, to where I could record direct and plug my pedals into to get my sound. I play into a clean fender super reverb, to give you a reference.
My thought would be to take a sansamp circuit and strip it down to basically the 'california' amp, 'clean' mod and one of the mic positions, maybe the classic. Basically have a blackface fender sound in a little direct injection circuit. I didn't want to go to the whole magilla to make the entire sansamp circuit, but it seems like if you just strip everything else away, this might be a manageable circuit and be useful for a lot of people.
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brett
Posts: 3816


Blackface box
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2003, 11:42:00 PM »

I am very disappointed with my SansAmp. The overdrive and hot-wired options give ridiculous amounts of gain and ordinary tone.  So I think you'd be dissappointed, too.  For what you want, cut out the "fender" and clean and classic mic settings, and you should be right.  

But most of this can be achieved with a set of Fender or Marshall tone controls and some treble-cut.  Check out my Pale Blue Box amp at the bottom of my website for a simple and tiny power amp with Marshall-like tone controls.  You could easily replace the LM386 with a TL072 (NOT pin-for pin) and use it in-line.  Here's my site: http://members.optusnet.com.au/~jethro.dog/gallery.html.

Have fun? Cheesy
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Brett Robinson
Let a hundred flowers bloom, let a hundred schools of thought contend. (Mao Zedong)
Joep
Posts: 431


WWW
An idea
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2003, 12:21:27 AM »

I did a few mods on the GT-2 I just finished (see one of my older post). The purpose was to get is a bit cleanen on the "clean" setting. If you strip down the circuit you can easily add this mods.

In my optinion the GT-2 is very usable for the purpose you discribe Ed. If you was more info on the mods I did send me an e-mail.

Bye,

Joep
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aron
Administrator
Posts: 10226

Aron Nelson


An idea
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2003, 01:43:00 AM »

Ed,

Wasn't that the reason for the Marshall Speaker sims and all the other ones?

Personally, I would modify the speaker sim of the JD-10. It's pretty darn good - along with the 3 band EQ.
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Ed G.
Posts: 767


An idea
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2003, 08:42:26 AM »

I'd have to go back and look at the speaker sims. I always thought it was just that...a speaker sim to run a preamp through for direct recording. I wanted more of a simulated amp and speaker, in my case, a cleanish fender combo, which now that your bring it up, the morley JD-10 may fit the bill.
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Rob Strand
Posts: 575


An idea
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2003, 10:02:56 AM »

Quote
I wanted more of a simulated amp and speaker, in my case, a cleanish fender combo,


I looked into this recently and decided it was easier to use a plug-in, there's absolutely nothing wrong with the idea though.

If you want an amp sound then you *have* to incorporate a tone stack before the speaker sim.  The choice of speaker sim is really up to you, IMHO none of the available sims give a good fender sound.   Mated with a tone stack the Marshall sims seemed OK to me, if you want an open back sound add a variable 1st order high-pass filter.  The JD-10 doesn't do the low-end speaker sim, and I had a mild preference to the highs of the Marshall sim for a "normal" tone.  The advantage of the JD-10 is it has a tone control which makes it more ampish.

If you want to go ahead with this contact me and we'll come-up with something.
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"If it turns out it’s like an onion with millions of layers… then that’s the way it is." — Richard Feynman
aron
Administrator
Posts: 10226

Aron Nelson


An idea
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2003, 01:29:53 PM »

Quote
I looked into this recently and decided it was easier to use a plug-in, there's absolutely nothing wrong with the idea though.


I didn't read it carefully enough, yes, I hate to admit this, but plug-ins are probably easier to use and they work well. Not only that, you can recall their settings.

Quote
The JD-10 doesn't do the low-end speaker sim,


What do you mean by this? The interesting part about the JD-10 is the apparent "thump" you get when the speaker emulation is in. It has fooled a number of guitarists. It's weird.


Aron
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Rob Strand
Posts: 575


An idea
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2003, 04:50:04 PM »

Quote
What do you mean by this?


Most speaker sims roll-off the low end to emulate  what the speaker does.  For some reason the JD-10 doesn't do this.  I  find this gives a very boomy sound, it just doesn't sound right to me.  The effect is far more noticeable on high quality headphones than say a PC speaker (which often have more roll-off than a guitar speaker!).
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"If it turns out it’s like an onion with millions of layers… then that’s the way it is." — Richard Feynman
aron
Administrator
Posts: 10226

Aron Nelson


An idea
« Reply #8 on: September 02, 2003, 06:15:50 PM »

Quote
Most speaker sims roll-off the low end to emulate what the speaker does. For some reason the JD-10 doesn't do this. I find this gives a very boomy sound, it just doesn't sound right to me
.

That is weird. Like I said, that's a feature that people always point to is the thump of the speaker sound on the JD-10  Smiley

I never really noticed the boominess. Maybe I roll off the lows on the 3 band though.

I do listen through my Grado headphones and monitor speakers. I never use PC speakers except at home.

Even then, I have Cambridge audio speakers, which are at least somewhat decent for PC speakers :-)
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AllyP
Posts: 83


An idea
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2003, 02:08:58 AM »

So......With the speaker sims they are really instead of speakers?


Dont look at me like that....I'm not stupid!!!

IS it something like this:

guitar > effects > amp > speaker sim > pc?

Or do I leave the amp out all togther....

I just wanna know before I decide to build it or not Smiley

Thanks again guys :wink:
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Rob Strand
Posts: 575


An idea
« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2003, 12:14:45 PM »

Quote

I never really noticed the boominess. Maybe I roll off the lows on the 3 band though.


That is definitely a possibility, the EQ could compensating for the lack low-end speaker sim.
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"If it turns out it’s like an onion with millions of layers… then that’s the way it is." — Richard Feynman
Rob Strand
Posts: 575


An idea
« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2003, 12:20:20 PM »

Quote
guitar > effects > amp > speaker sim > pc?


That's one possibility but you have to have a load on the amp either a dummy reactive load, or a power soak unit.  Unfortunately what you use as amp load affects the finally result.

Anyway Ed and I are removing the whole amp and speaker, which is slightly different, it's an amp+speaker sim,

guitar -> effects ->  Our Box (Amp/Speaker Sim) -> pc
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"If it turns out it’s like an onion with millions of layers… then that’s the way it is." — Richard Feynman
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