Author Topic: 1: Tools  (Read 88251 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

diystomp

1: Tools
« on: September 22, 2003, 04:06:54 PM »
To start off, you will need:

Wire cutter/stripper. So that you can cut and strip wires.
Needle nose pliers (small). Very useful to bend leads etc....
Wire snips (picture to come). Allows you to cut wire close to the solder joint.
Solder
Solder Sucker - or Desolder Braid  :)
- I prefer the solder sucker bulb or "syringe" looking sucker. Keep a skinny nail handy to clear the bulb if it gets stuck with solder.
A decent soldering iron. 15-30 watts, even the Radio Shack one is OK for a few projects before the tip breaks down.
A digital multimeter.
A logbook (an artists sketch book works great. This is the type with the thick paper - you can build and write info in it)
Xacto Knife or other sharp knife for scoring the perfboard.
Ruler for guiding the knife.


Needlenose pliers (rightmost)
Wire Snips (leftmost)
Wire Cutter/Stripper (2nd from left)
2nd from right is a cutter that I use - it's cool because it doesn't "snap" and fly cut leads everywhere after cutting.




Sketch Book



Desolder tools



Meter



Perfboard



Please ask if you have any questions.

stratking

1: Tools
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2003, 09:22:29 PM »
I have an analog multimeter.  I'm just wondering if this will work as well.  Never used it before because, well I have no idea how to. Will this work as well until I can save up for a good multimeter?

Thanks,

stratking

aron

1: Tools
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2003, 09:33:02 PM »
Yes it will. You will have to measure voltages. Not a big deal. I just said Digital because it's easier to read and easy to use and cheap.

bwanasonic

1: Tools
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2003, 01:17:43 AM »
May I add desoldering braid to the list?  :wink:

diystomp

1: Tools
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2003, 02:45:12 AM »
Thank You!

B Tremblay

1: Tools
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2003, 07:33:43 AM »
I'd like to mention that the small clip-on heat sink from Radio Shack has been  indispensable to me when building on perfboard.  I rarely use it as a heat sink, but rather as a "third hand" to keep component leads or wires from moving when I'm applying solder.  A hemostat or another type of locking needle-nose tool could serve the same function.
B Tremblay
runoffgroove.com

aron

1: Tools
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2003, 03:26:52 PM »
I've used those "clips on a stand" as a 3rd hand before, but in most cases, I haven't had to use anything like this.

Good tip about those heat sinks.

Thanks!

bwanasonic

1: Tools
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2003, 03:32:44 PM »
Super-geek safety glasses optional:


fretbuzz2003

1: Tools
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2003, 06:10:58 PM »
Where do we get the perfboard and what size? Can we wait until we order the rest of the parts?

aron

1: Tools
« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2003, 06:14:51 PM »
I get my perfboard from Radio Shack. The only reason being that it's close by and I can get it whenever I need it.

Small Bear also sells perboard as well. His is better quality than the Radio Shack one but is harder (impossible?) to cut.

Aron

Marcus Dahl

1: Tools
« Reply #10 on: September 23, 2003, 08:27:23 PM »
Quote from: B Tremblay
I'd like to mention that the small clip-on heat sink from Radio Shack has been  indispensable to me when building on perfboard.  I rarely use it as a heat sink, but rather as a "third hand" to keep component leads or wires from moving when I'm applying solder.  A hemostat or another type of locking needle-nose tool could serve the same function.


I like using alligator clips instead. You can get them by the pack at Radio Shack for cheap. I'm always losing my heat sink clip. So I got a whole bag of alligator clips instead. I can use them as an extra hand, heat sink, or for my test projects. They are very handy.

By the way if you are trying to do a quick repair job and need a quick heat sink but don't have one handy. You can use a paper clip...
Marcus Dahl

jimmy

1: Tools
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2003, 07:07:05 AM »
hey fair go for the safety glasses guy!

haha
"Who the f*** are the naked chefs?" - Ozzy Osbourne

tubes or bust

Gus

1: Tools
« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2003, 11:51:32 AM »
If you are new to the hobby you might not have a work bench.

  I would find an old cutting board a piece of  plywood etc.  I would place the board on a table to save the table from drilling, cuts, solder etc.

  This is good for keeping others in the house happy.

Gus

The Tone God

1: Tools
« Reply #13 on: September 25, 2003, 03:30:03 PM »
Quote from: aron
His is better quality than the Radio Shack one but is harder (impossible?) to cut.


Ever tried using tin snips to cut the perf board then smooth out edges with some filing ? Works great on perf board that has pre-tinned through holes.

Andrew

Phiredog

1: Tools
« Reply #14 on: September 26, 2003, 08:54:31 AM »
Do you have a recommended soldering iron to get or is wattage my only concern?  

I am using a Weller trigger model now my Dad gave me, but I find it somewhat awkward to use.

aron

1: Tools
« Reply #15 on: September 26, 2003, 02:17:02 PM »
Is that the weller gun? If so, it's too powerful.

Good question, you want something with a smaller tip for working with PCB boards. You can ask your local store for an appropriate soldering iron.

I will get a picture of the tip I use, it's conical - like a pen tip, although not as pointed.

Andy

1: Tools
« Reply #16 on: September 26, 2003, 03:31:28 PM »
that weller is gonna be too much.  get a pen-style weller (I assume you meant you have the gun-style which is 100- 250 WATTS).  Get it from 15 to 25 watts.  

Get the solder that's 31 in diameter.  It melts faster at lower temps.
Andy

Phiredog

1: Tools
« Reply #17 on: September 28, 2003, 02:34:08 PM »
Yeah, I have the Weller gun model. I also have an el cheapo from Big Lots that is a 30 watt model I'll use until I get a better one. Thanks for the help!

Ice9Rg570

  • Guest
1: Tools
« Reply #18 on: October 06, 2003, 02:18:49 AM »
I am interested in this project aswell


For the multimeter will this work for this project and for other more elaborate ones?

http://www.radioshack.com/product.asp?catalog%5Fname=CTLG&category%5Fname=CTLG%5F011%5F008%5F002%5F000&product%5Fid=22%2D813

or do i need a better one?

thanks!

aron

1: Tools
« Reply #19 on: October 06, 2003, 02:41:55 AM »
That will work. For beginners, I usually recommend auto-ranging. Radio Shack used to make one with Auto-Ranging and auto battery turn off for around $20-$29.

It was tiny too. Maybe they have it in your local store?