Author Topic: 1: Tools  (Read 88241 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

aron

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #40 on: March 29, 2006, 03:36:10 PM »
Hi all , Im newbie here,
just want to ask , bout the size of perfboard ....


I use the perfboard that I sell in the store and I usually use a larger piece then score and snap it to the correct size after I finish the circuit.

http://www.diystompboxes.com/cart/

didier

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #41 on: September 03, 2006, 08:19:43 AM »
May i recommend safety glasses to everyone?!

a guy at my school managed to blow up a very small electrolityc cap and it shot in the air INTO HIS EYE, he is now blind at that eye!

it may look geeky, but if you are a beginner, and also more advanced builders may have moments where they are not as concentrated as they should be...

i wear them all the time when building because i would hate to end up like the other guy...
Complete: TS-808; LPB2; Orange Squeezer; Green Ringer; Foxx Tone Machine; LM3886 PowerAmp.
To Be Completed: DOD440; Professor Tweed; LHX; Real McTube 2; Rebote 2.5 Delay; ETI MN3011 Reverb;

Minion

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #42 on: December 01, 2006, 04:16:05 PM »
If Poeple are looking for Places to get Good quality Parts on the very cheap then check out E-Bay as you can get some awesome deals on there, I pay usually about 10% to 50% of Retail for most all my Parts....Like 100 0.1uF Metal Film Caps for $3, or 3000 1% resistors in 26 Values for $11, or 6 Square feet of Blank PCB Material for $13 (I never use Perf board and probably never will) , or 8 Pin Dip IC sockets for 6c each , and I recently bought 20 10,000uF 63v Caps for under $1 each and these are just some basic examples of prices I pay from some specific sellers on e-bay....I also buy my 20w soldering Irons for .99c each at the dollar store.....

So if poeple really are on a tight budget like me then there are ways to get Good Parts for dirt cheap if you know were to look......


Cheers
Go to bed with itchy Bum , wake up with stinky finger !!

jcwillow777

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #43 on: February 03, 2007, 03:19:24 AM »
I get my perfboard from Radio Shack. The only reason being that it's close by and I can get it whenever I need it.

Small Bear also sells perboard as well. His is better quality than the Radio Shack one but is harder (impossible?) to cut.

Aron

I personally like the perf board the that Aaron sells. I've done one overdrive using it, and I like it better than what Radio Schack sells. Sometimes Radio Schack is just conveient.

Red2112

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #44 on: April 29, 2007, 08:10:52 PM »
Greetings folks,

Just wondering if anyone uses a board like the one in the pic below to try out there projects. It's made out of plastic and you don't need to solder, you can use jumper wires (you can see them in the transparent box just above the pref board).

I just got into this, so yes aim a newbie  :icon_mrgreen:



BTW, thanks you for such a great site Aron!

Good care and thanks.

Oh, I forgot! Can you use a BS170 transistor for the beginners boost project?

12milluz

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #45 on: July 13, 2007, 08:09:47 PM »
simple question here, im new to this all, and know little bout soldering, well ive never used flux. do we need flux for this project?
Quote from: Processaurus
You need a glade plug-in, in on a footswitch.  Kick on the big muff, then hit the air freshener pedal.

Visit my site: http://www.freewebs.com/12milluzmusic

suprleed

Re: 1: Tools - Multimeter question
« Reply #46 on: January 10, 2008, 04:15:26 PM »
I've been playing around with my first multimeter and had a quick question.

I purchased a meter with hfe measurement capability.  It has the little slots to insert the tranny pins into marked C,B,E with one set for NPN and another for PNP.  Can I test Jfets using this feature by lining up the drain with the collector slot, the gate with the base, and the source with the emmiter?  Or could I potentially damage my Jfets doing this?  I don't want to fry any parts.

My second build is a Jfet based overdrive and I would like to test the hfe if possible.

Thanks.
"That's the way I play" ~EC

aron

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #47 on: January 10, 2008, 08:23:30 PM »
Unfortunately not. You cannot test the JFET in there.

You can test FETs like this:

http://www.geofex.com/Article_Folders/fetmatch/fetmatch.htm

dietsociety

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #48 on: September 29, 2010, 03:45:32 PM »
Greetings folks,

Just wondering if anyone uses a board like the one in the pic below to try out there projects. It's made out of plastic and you don't need to solder, you can use jumper wires (you can see them in the transparent box just above the pref board).

I just got into this, so yes aim a newbie  :icon_mrgreen:



BTW, thanks you for such a great site Aron!

Good care and thanks.

Oh, I forgot! Can you use a BS170 transistor for the beginners boost project?

I can't answer about the transistor, but I've used breadboard for a lot of basic layout stuff for circuits - they're really useful for prototyping and mucking about because you don't have to solder.

moose23

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #49 on: September 29, 2010, 04:11:02 PM »
Greetings folks,

Just wondering if anyone uses a board like the one in the pic below to try out there projects. It's made out of plastic and you don't need to solder, you can use jumper wires (you can see them in the transparent box just above the pref board).

I just got into this, so yes aim a newbie  :icon_mrgreen:



BTW, thanks you for such a great site Aron!

Good care and thanks.

Oh, I forgot! Can you use a BS170 transistor for the beginners boost project?

You could definitely make the "Super Hard On" with the BS170 and it's just as easy to make as the beginners boost.

bigmufffuzzwizz

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #50 on: March 13, 2011, 11:41:58 PM »
OOOhhh the essentials!!! Always remember my boss telling me, "your not using the right tools for the job" :D
Magic Pedals Home of The Shrine Fuzz!

Zigioman

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #51 on: August 31, 2011, 05:20:46 PM »
Hi I'm new at this as you might imagine since I'm planning on doing this project. I have a 40 watt Weller soldering iron that is fixed temperature and .062" rosin core electrical solder from when I had to re-solder the wiring in one of my guitars a while back. I'm getting the sense that the soldering iron is probably okay but I should be careful not to let the circuts get to hot. My question is if the solder is going to be too thick and cause me problems? Also whether I should get the beginner project parts kit or buy the various components in bulk like this

You can get 500 resistors in a ton of different values from Radio Shack for about $11 (if I recall correctly).

Steve at Smallbear sells variety packs of caps as well:
100 film caps for $13.95
32 silver mica caps for $13.00
55 electrolytic caps for $11.50

So, for about $50 you can be well stocked up for most of the projects you are likely to come across. After wasting a lot of money buying a few caps here, a couple resistors there, I wised up, bought the packs mentioned above and now I am set for a good, long time.

entinggi

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #52 on: August 02, 2012, 11:58:39 AM »
I have a question fro the soldering iron.. Is a 40 watt iron too hot or would it be ok to use?

gisecke

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #53 on: August 28, 2012, 08:19:59 AM »
I have a question fro the soldering iron.. Is a 40 watt iron too hot or would it be ok to use?

It's Ok. I use a 40W soldering iron, but careful to burn components
Debian User's

zaqzaq

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #54 on: December 15, 2012, 12:55:22 AM »
what about a 60 watts soldering iron? :/ i read goodreviews about this 60w one, thats supposed to have "some" temperature control.. will it get too hot? what is the problem with higher watts? sorry for the newbie question

hymenoptera

Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #55 on: August 15, 2015, 10:47:05 AM »
I just wanted to answer these old questions about 40w and 60w pencils, yes you can use them, but it might not be best for a beginner.

Higher heat can be nice for heavier stuff like 1/4" jacks, making patch cables, etc. However, when it comes to smaller components, especially heat sensitive parts such as semiconductors (diodes, transistors, ICs), and even certain film capacitors, certain (cheap) switches, etc, you really want something with less heat and/or mass because you could destroy the part before you've even turned it on!

It's possible to solder tiny/sensitive stuff with a 45w or whatever, but you have to "get in and get out" fast, and that's something that just comes with experience.

For beginners, if you already have the higher wattage pencil, and can't afford an adjustable soldering station (I recommend the Hakko FX-888 or Weller WES-51, both are about US$100), then just buy a second pencil that rated for 15w to 25w and then you'll have your bases covered.

If you can, try to find one with a chisel tip, or one that takes replacement tips that you can find to customize.

Finally, I can recommend to anyone just starting out to watch the videos on youtube from Pace and also the first two from EEVBlog.
"Radio Shack has nothing for anyone who's serious about electronics." - Jeri Ellsworth