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DIYstompboxes.com  |  Projects  |  Beginner Project  |  1: Tools 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Ice9Rg570
Guest
1: Tools
« Reply #20 on: October 06, 2003, 01:02:59 AM »

Quote from: aron
That will work. For beginners, I usually recommend auto-ranging. Radio Shack used to make one with Auto-Ranging and auto battery turn off for around $20-$29.

It was tiny too. Maybe they have it in your local store?


http://www.radioshack.com/product.asp?catalog%5Fname=CTLG&category%5Fname=CTLG%5F011%5F008%5F002%5F000&product%5Fid=22%2D802  would that be what your talking about?

I would like this to work for more advanced projects in the future...

THis is the neck one they have that has the auto-ranging...
http://www.radioshack.com/product.asp?catalog%5Fname=CTLG&category%5Fname=CTLG%5F011%5F008%5F002%5F000&product%5Fid=22%2D811  A little more expensive, but if it is worth it I will get it.

Let me know. thanks! and thanks for doing this project. I really appreciate it!
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aron
Administrator
Posts: 10196

Aron Nelson


1: Tools
« Reply #21 on: October 06, 2003, 01:18:34 AM »

Hey,

That first one is the one.  YEAH, $19.99.

They raised the price a little while ago, but it's back @ $19.99.

I still use it to debug now and then.

It works fine for most of our small circuits. Yes, it doesn't have all the bells and whistles but it works for most things.

Do you have to get another multimeter later? Maybe, and you will probably want to.... but this little guy will work for many projects.
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Mike
Posts: 8


1: Tools
« Reply #22 on: March 08, 2004, 12:29:01 PM »

I'm a total newbie here.
Some great info in this forum and I'm going to give the beginner project a try.

Now, I do have basic soldering skills and have tried some basic beginner mods (SD-1 808 mod).

I'm just not sure what kind of Mulimeter I would need.  I've never used one before.  What do they test??
I've seen ranges of 15 to 42. I don't know what that means.  What number should I get?

Thanks
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my hair is on fire
smoguzbenjamin
Posts: 2718

Ben Allen


1: Tools
« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2004, 01:02:20 PM »

Get a Digital Multi Meter. Even a cheap one will do. The instruction manual will teach you how to use it properly and otherwise just post back here Smiley

It'll measure at least volts DC, volts AC, resistance and current. Some can test transistor gain and even capacitance!
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I don't like Holland. Nobody has the transistors I want.
aron
Administrator
Posts: 10196

Aron Nelson


1: Tools
« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2004, 01:21:27 PM »

The meter I recommened is in the FAQ, but what I look for is:

Auto Ranging (it automatically sets the range on the meter). This is GREAT for beginners.

Most will have the usual, resistance, AC,DC,continuity.

Then the advanced cool stuff for us:

Transistor checker
Transistor hFE check
Transistor auto pinout identification
Capacitance (for checking capacitors).

For all of this, you should expect to pay up to $100.

For one without the advanced stuff (but with auto ranging), probably around $30.

Aron
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smoguzbenjamin
Posts: 2718

Ben Allen


1: Tools
« Reply #25 on: March 08, 2004, 02:37:27 PM »

I bought my manual DMM for the equivalent of $10
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I don't like Holland. Nobody has the transistors I want.
slackhammer
Posts: 19


beginner
« Reply #26 on: April 14, 2004, 12:49:25 PM »

what's the best way to get started with parts?  is there any way to get a "vaiety pack" of resistors, caps, etc?

I want to do my first build, the "tremolus lune" and want to know the best way to go about getting the parts.
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PB Wilson
Posts: 311


1: Tools
« Reply #27 on: April 14, 2004, 03:45:23 PM »

You can get 500 resistors in a ton of different values from Radio Shack for about $11 (if I recall correctly).

Steve at Smallbear sells variety packs of caps as well:
100 film caps for $13.95
32 silver mica caps for $13.00
55 electrolytic caps for $11.50

So, for about $50 you can be well stocked up for most of the projects you are likely to come across. After wasting a lot of money buying a few caps here, a couple resistors there, I wised up, bought the packs mentioned above and now I am set for a good, long time.
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FisTheGoon
Posts: 106


1: Tools
« Reply #28 on: December 05, 2004, 07:51:13 AM »

What  wattage is good for soldering? cause at certain wattage componnt might burn or damaged. thanks :?
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Hal
Posts: 2098



1: Tools
« Reply #29 on: December 05, 2004, 04:39:04 PM »

a 15-25 watt iron is deff. high enough.  Up to 40 watts your pushing high heat.  I don't recomend anything above 40 watts.

If possible, get a variable temperature iron, and practice before you set to anything real.

Good luck :-D
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JLM
Posts: 1


Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #30 on: October 17, 2005, 12:03:37 AM »

All I have right now is a 50W soldering iron...  Undecided  Will it work or it's just too much power?
Do I really need to buy a less powerfull one, even if use sockets for ICs?  Huh
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niftydog
Posts: 2006


Hey you're a dog, a BIG dog, a nifty-keen-type dog


Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #31 on: October 17, 2005, 12:16:49 AM »

is it adjustable in temperature?

It's not too much, even if it's not adjustable, but you do have to be carful not to allow too much heat to be transfered to the components and circuit board.

What you might find is that the tips are too large. Often with large soldering irons there's limited replacement tip sizes, and a tip that's too large is effectively useless.
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niftydog
Shrimp down the pants!!!
“It also sounded something like the movement of furniture, which He
hadn't even created yet, and He was not so pleased.” God (aka Tony Levin)
guythmike
Posts: 3


Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2006, 02:35:38 PM »

does it matter what type of solder you use? there's different types, like silver bearing and rosin core and such. which is better?
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theundeadelvis
Posts: 1184

Ahren O., Bloomington, IN


Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #33 on: February 05, 2006, 02:49:42 PM »

A lot of folks here swear by 63/37 rosin core solder. I use 60/40 in a .032 diameter (from Radio Shack) and its work great. I have a roll of 63/37 but it's in a .050 diameter and its way too thick for my liking. I plan on getting the 63/37 in a smaller diameter and trying it. Anyway, a thin rosin core (with a flux that either doesn't need cleane or is easily cleaned) soldereither 60/40 or 63/37 is what I recommend.
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If it ain't broke...   ...it will be soon.
guythmike
Posts: 3


Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #34 on: February 05, 2006, 03:09:03 PM »

thanks a lot.

i'd say "i'm new to this" like everyone else, but i figure it's pretty obvious.
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Dannycasio
Posts: 8



WWW
Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #35 on: March 14, 2006, 06:31:46 AM »

I have a Weller Iron 60W/230V (W60D). Is this too powerful?
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aron
Administrator
Posts: 10196

Aron Nelson


Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #36 on: March 14, 2006, 11:42:28 AM »

If it's a fixed wattage, then I would say yes. Radio Shack or your local electronics store will have a lower wattage/pencil type iron that would be better suited. Just tell them that you are working on PCB and smaller components and they will point you to the right tools.
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UP-G
Posts: 7


Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #37 on: March 27, 2006, 07:28:46 AM »

What is a desolder braid and how does it work Huh I've never worked with it ...
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ST_ELM
Posts: 2


Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #38 on: March 27, 2006, 08:08:50 AM »

Hi all , Im newbie here,
just want to ask , bout the size of perfboard ....
thaks in advance ...

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aron
Administrator
Posts: 10196

Aron Nelson


Re: 1: Tools
« Reply #39 on: March 29, 2006, 02:34:51 PM »

What is a desolder braid and how does it work Huh I've never worked with it ...

The way I've used it is to press the braid against the solder joint and heat. The braid will "wick up" the solder. Then remove the braid and the solder joint will be pretty clean. That being said, I use those plunger type solder removers for most of my work.
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