Author Topic: 2: The Schematic and parts list  (Read 252973 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

aron

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #20 on: October 03, 2003, 01:12:24 PM »
I always build the circuit without the box and switch first. Once I know it's working, then I add the switch and box it if I like it.

Yes, it's very easy to add.

Cliff

Smart thinking
« Reply #21 on: October 03, 2003, 04:05:06 PM »
"Once I know it's working, then I add the switch and box it if I like it."

Smart....and very logical.  Tell me, have you done this before?  :D
Thanks

aron

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2003, 05:30:39 PM »
The box I use is the Hammond 1590BB, for mostly everything.

PeterJ

Confusion about Pot Wiring
« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2003, 05:56:48 PM »
Aron -- First, thanks for doing this -- this will be a huge help to a newbie like me (most I've ever done is replace a stomp switch and a couple of jacks).

The schematic shows the 47uf capacitor connected to both the wiper of the pot and the lug going to ground, but in your sketch it looks like the cap is connected to the wiper and the lug connected to the rest of the circuit. Am I reading this right? Since I'm not good at schematics, can you clarify how to tell which lug is which and how the pot fits into the circuit? Thanks,

Peter
Duct tape and particle board!

aron

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2003, 06:52:09 PM »
Hey, you are right!

I will fix this.

OK, it's fixed. Thanks!

Aron

cobainlives_05

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #25 on: December 05, 2003, 07:14:33 PM »
I was just wondering, why does it take a mono and a stereo jack?  And also, how do you know where to put the switch?

travissk

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #26 on: December 05, 2003, 07:28:41 PM »
It could be done with two mono jacks, but a stero jack is useful on the input because the extra lead is used to detect when a guitar cord is inserted; the pedal is only on when a cord is present.

aron

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #27 on: December 05, 2003, 08:27:35 PM »
Quote from: cobainlives_05
I was just wondering, why does it take a mono and a stereo jack?  And also, how do you know where to put the switch?


That one is in the DIY FAQ under:How do I make the input jack switch the power on and off?

That switches the pedal on and off when the input jack is inserted.

pbsk8er03

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2004, 03:28:49 PM »
One .1uF (Film if possible)


Sorry im new here. Whats a .1uf???

pbsk8er03

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2004, 03:43:43 PM »
I couldnt find any .1 ufs or 10 ufs or anything that said UF on small bear :?

smoguzbenjamin

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #30 on: May 13, 2004, 11:59:34 AM »
A capacitor's capacitance (something like electrical storage but alittle different) is measured in Farads or F for short. You can derive smaller units from that, and derived units use prefixes:

milli (mF) 1mF = 0.001F
micro (uF) 1uF = 0.001mF
nano (nF) 1nF = 0.001uF
pico (pF) 1pF = 0.001nF

These are all measures of capacitance, which means it's a capacitor ;) The largest cap you'll probably see is 1000uF, or 1mF but people use 1000uF for some reason. One thing to look out for with caps is that they have a maximum voltage rating. Anything above the max voltage in your circuit is OK (16v caps are good for 9v circuits). Anything bigger is OK but the size increases as you up the voltage. There's no point in using a huge 300v cap for a 9v pedal. :)

Look under 'capacitors' at SBE.
I don't like Holland. Nobody has the transistors I want.

smoguzbenjamin

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #31 on: May 13, 2004, 12:02:42 PM »
Oh I forgot to mention: some caps are polarized. These have an indicator for the negative lead on the package, usually with a '-' or an arrow or something. Most caps over 1uF are electrolythic and therefore polarized. It's important that you orient these correctly, otherwise they won't work and in extreme cases even explode. I've had that happen to me once and it gave a bad smell and an icky mess ;)
I don't like Holland. Nobody has the transistors I want.

johnyze

capicitors
« Reply #32 on: June 10, 2004, 01:38:22 PM »
Hey aron, how is it goin? Thanks for your quick reply before! I've got another question: when I purchased my parts, they gave me a polyester capicitor, and being the new guy I am, how does this affect the building of my pedal? It looks as if the cap is polarized, since one end is marked with a giant minus sign, but I am unsure. Please let me know what this means, or if I should just go out and purchase a film cap. Thanks

John

aron

Re: capicitors
« Reply #33 on: June 10, 2004, 06:22:47 PM »
Quote from: johnyze
Hey aron, how is it goin? Thanks for your quick reply before! I've got another question: when I purchased my parts, they gave me a polyester capicitor,
John


Do you polarized capacitor???

You should have 3 of them. (10uF, 22uF and 47uF).

The .1uF input cap should be non-polarized.

Aron

chokeyou

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #34 on: August 21, 2004, 12:19:07 AM »
hey i just bought all my stuff for this project and realized my capacitors were different- axial leads...do the little arrows in the stripe point to negative like i wired my perfboard up or do they point to positive...meaning i should just start over?

bazzwazzle

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #35 on: August 21, 2004, 12:30:26 AM »
yep, the little arrows point to negative ;) your doing it right

vanhansen

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #36 on: September 03, 2004, 10:09:05 AM »
Hey all.  I'm a complete newbee to this and am going to make an attempt at making this project.  I do have a few questions about the caps and resistors.

Are the resistors 1/2W or 1/4W?

What's the voltage of the caps?

Does any of this matter?

Thanks.

Erik
Erik

remmelt

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #37 on: September 03, 2004, 10:59:11 AM »
i am not sure about the caps, but i think 1/4w are fine.

the voltage of this circuit is nowhere above 9v, so the first one above 9v is good. this will usualy be 16v caps.


have fun!

Gismo834

2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #38 on: December 13, 2004, 08:09:46 AM »
Quote from: smoguzbenjamin
A capacitor's capacitance (something like electrical storage but alittle different) is measured in Farads or F for short. You can derive smaller units from that, and derived units use prefixes:

milli (mF) 1mF = 0.001F
micro (uF) 1uF = 0.001mF
nano (nF) 1nF = 0.001uF
pico (pF) 1pF = 0.001nF

These are all measures of capacitance, which means it's a capacitor ;) The largest cap you'll probably see is 1000uF, or 1mF but people use 1000uF for some reason. One thing to look out for with caps is that they have a maximum voltage rating. Anything above the max voltage in your circuit is OK (16v caps are good for 9v circuits). Anything bigger is OK but the size increases as you up the voltage. There's no point in using a huge 300v cap for a 9v pedal. :)

Look under 'capacitors' at SBE.


So 0.1 uF means 100 nF ?

niftydog

  • Poster2
  • **
  • Posts: 2006
  • Total likes: 0
  • Hey you're a dog, a BIG dog, a nifty-keen-type dog
2: The Schematic and parts list
« Reply #39 on: December 13, 2004, 05:08:19 PM »
yes.
niftydog
Shrimp down the pants!!!
“It also sounded something like the movement of furniture, which He
hadn't even created yet, and He was not so pleased.” God (aka Tony Levin)