Author Topic: What DSP is used in new Behringer RSM pedals?  (Read 4480 times)

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SeanCostello

What DSP is used in new Behringer RSM pedals?
« on: September 15, 2010, 03:26:09 PM »
Hi all:

I was reading up on the Behringer RV600 pedal, and the specs seem close to the Line 6 Verbzilla. Very very close. Behringer touts their new "RSM" (Real Sound Modeling) on their website, and a bit of Googling turns up that they are using a 24-bit DSP, which seems different than the CoolAudio AL3201 clone that they had used in older products.

So, anyone know what DSP is used in the RSM pedals? Is it a DSP56364, like the ToneCore series? Is it a proprietary chip?

Thanks,

Sean Costello

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Re: What DSP is used in new Behringer RSM pedals?
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2010, 03:42:32 PM »
Some people like to rehouse these, and there are a few gut shots I found:

http://revolutiondeux.blogspot.com/2009/02/how-to-turn-poor-reverb-into-very.html

Not much to make out, I'm afraid, but maybe if we ask them...

SeanCostello

Re: What DSP is used in new Behringer RSM pedals?
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2010, 08:23:08 PM »
Some people like to rehouse these, and there are a few gut shots I found:

http://revolutiondeux.blogspot.com/2009/02/how-to-turn-poor-reverb-into-very.html

Not much to make out, I'm afraid, but maybe if we ask them...

Well, it clearly isn't the Coolaudio V1000. Looks like it could be a DSP56364. I wonder if they actually reverse engineered the Line 6 Verbzilla algorithms.

Thanks for the link,

Sean

Transmogrifox

Re: What DSP is used in new Behringer RSM pedals?
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2010, 12:54:53 PM »
Convolution-based reverb algorithms are no secret (HRTF IIR + delays):  One for example, http://www.kokkinizita.net/papers/aella.pdf ...not to mention the wealth of knowledge found on CCRMA public information, and of course, published works as well.  In that case they could be emulating any hardware verb or physical space.  Did they copy Verbzilla impulse responses?  Probably not.  Either way I would give them the benefit of the doubt they did their own work to design a reverb algorithm and obtain impulse responses.  I have been rather impressed with the price/quality ratio of Behringer's products and I don't get the impression they pull dirty tricks...most of the cost difference can be found in the physical construction of many of their products...and well...I can live with that in most cases :) .

Now I went off-topic.  Unfortunately I don't know what DSP they use in those.
trans·mog·ri·fy
tr.v. trans·mog·ri·fied, trans·mog·ri·fy·ing, trans·mog·ri·fies To change into a different shape or form, especially one that is fantastic or bizarre.

SeanCostello

Re: What DSP is used in new Behringer RSM pedals?
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2010, 12:41:13 AM »
I've heard of some rather questionable practices with past Behringer products. However, I think it is likely that they do write their own reverb algorithms. By all accounts, the REV-2496 is a great sounding box, while it is working (it is also supposed to break down quite a bit). The reverb pedal I have tried seemed to have original reverb algorithms in it, although all of them seemed to have too long of a decay at the shortest setting. My guess is that they used allpass loop reverbs with the allpass coefficients set too high, but I can't be sure, although the V1000 architecture lends itself to allpass loops more readily than to algorithms that use parallel loops.

Sean Costello