Author Topic: 3: Build pictorial  (Read 172004 times)

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rubberabbit

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #20 on: October 04, 2004, 07:04:30 AM »
ok the page is fine...at the end it says 'now for the wires'...how?

remmelt

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #21 on: October 04, 2004, 03:32:04 PM »
go to the next step!

rubberabbit

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2004, 06:57:32 AM »
Quote from: remmelt
go to the next step!

yep! done! :) i meant done reading.  :(

mattdowney

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2005, 02:09:20 PM »
i have a question, does the positive wire from the battery snap go directly to the switch or to the board then the switch? i am using a 3PDT switch and a LED. also (this is a very dumb question) but what wire on my battery clip is positive? the red or the black? i cant tell what terminal they go to.

thanks, matt

KORGULL

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #24 on: January 19, 2005, 08:51:24 PM »
I believe the battery positive (red) goes to the board then the switch.
There's a wiring diagram in the "Switches/Bypass/Etc.." sticky thread you should check out - if you haven't already.

Longlivedave

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #25 on: March 02, 2005, 12:39:53 PM »
how would you modify this for an onboard guitar effect

aron

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #26 on: March 02, 2005, 03:25:11 PM »
For an onboard guitar effect, build it as small as possible. Fit the battery and the circuit into the guitar. Put the circuit at the end of the guitar circuit (i.e. where the output jack usually connects to). So the output jack wire would go to the input of the circuit. Output of the circuit goes to the output jack.

Use a DPDT mini-toggle to have an active/passive switch and make the output jack a stereo one to switch the circuit on/off.

therecordingart

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #27 on: March 26, 2005, 12:11:13 AM »
Ok...finished with the perfboard...what next?

therecordingart

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #28 on: March 26, 2005, 03:15:38 AM »
What would happen if I used a 500K pot?  I have one of those floating around!

H4T

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #29 on: May 02, 2005, 09:44:01 AM »
Uhm, I don't see a potentiometer anywhere in that tutorial, I thought the schematic called for a 5k pot?

Also, why is there a makeshift transistor socket, when theres no place for it in the schematic? I'm confused about how these parts just show up and don't show up :\

Edit: Oh, I see now the 5k pot is wired to the board after soldering. But the DIP8 socket thing is still confusing to me!

aron

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #30 on: May 02, 2005, 04:18:15 PM »
>What would happen if I used a 500K pot? I have one of those floating around!

It would probably not work at all. You could put a 5K resistor from one outer lug to another outer lug and then it would probably work, but the taper would be screwed up.

Easier to get a 5K pot.

aron

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #31 on: May 02, 2005, 04:21:05 PM »
>Also, why is there a makeshift transistor socket, when theres no place for it in the schematic? I'm confused about how these parts just show up and don't show up

Transistor sockets are generally hard to find and/or expensive.

I wanted to show a way that a commonly found DIP 8 could be converted to a transistor socket.

Why use a socket? You can try different transistors easily and there's less chance of ruining the transistor from bad soldering.

Aron

H4T

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #32 on: May 02, 2005, 04:47:18 PM »
Hm, so does the transistor socket belong somewhere on the schematic, or is a build time kind of thing just to make things work? I take it that the transistor in these pedals is the most important part, haha.

aron

3: Build pictorial
« Reply #33 on: May 02, 2005, 05:33:45 PM »
It does not belong on the schematic. It's just a convenient way of mounting a transistor. A schematic describes the circuit, not necessarily every single part you might use to make the circuit.

kingofrod

Re: 3: Build pictorial
« Reply #34 on: January 17, 2006, 11:43:48 PM »
Quote
It does not belong on the schematic. It's just a convenient way of mounting a transistor. A schematic describes the circuit, not necessarily every single part you might use to make the circuit.

Sorry to drag out this question, but I'm a little unsure of how to mount the transistor socket.  Do you simply plug it into the perfboard and that's it, or do you have to solder?  After that, can you pop transistors in and out of the socket or do you need to solder that too? 

Thank you for your time, this is like a whole new world to me but I'm very excited about giving this a shot.

aron

Re: 3: Build pictorial
« Reply #35 on: January 18, 2006, 02:50:02 PM »
The transistor socket has leads just like a transistor (although shorter). Simply stick it through the perfboard and then solder the leads (3 of them). After that, you can just stick the transistor into the socket (no soldering for this).

Pull out a transistor and try another. Very FUN!

Good Luck!

kingofrod

Re: 3: Build pictorial
« Reply #36 on: January 19, 2006, 12:03:00 AM »
Thank you very much for the help, and I can't wait to try this out!

ChamberMonk

Re: 3: Build pictorial
« Reply #37 on: March 22, 2006, 02:10:08 PM »
I dont understand what is the transitor socket for?

Roobin

Re: 3: Build pictorial
« Reply #38 on: March 22, 2006, 04:50:13 PM »
A transistor socket usually looks like three holes in a row, on a plastic rectangle, with three leads pointing out. To use:
1) Do not put the transistor into the socket yet (as this will defeat the point of the following steps)
2) Put the transistor socket on the perfboard (or pcb) and solder each lead to the relevant component. Make sure that you know which way the transistor is oriented when you will insert it. e.g. (using Bipolar) if the layout is
             
            Base

Collector         Emitter

when looking from below, make sure that the socket is oriented like this:

To collector connections   To base connections  To Emitter connections
    |                                             |                                 |
    |                                             |                                 |
Collector                                    Base                          Emitter

when looking from above.

3)Once soldered, let everything cool for a littel while
4) Insert transistor (making sure it is oriented correctly)

This means you can change transistors, and avoids damaging them through soldering.

ST_ELM

Re: 3: Build pictorial
« Reply #39 on: March 29, 2006, 06:11:53 PM »
Hi guys , Hi Aron ,

i have done with build the board (put all the component on the board ),soory for asking stupid question,  how can i check that the board is working?  cos, this is my first project, and im pretty sure i make a mistake when soldering. Im also want to make sure that everything ok before continue to wiring.

Thanx in advance