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DIYstompboxes.com  |  DIY Stompboxes  |  Building your own stompbox  |  BC109 Question 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: BC109 Question  (Read 831 times)
Ofek Deitch
Posts: 196


OFEK DEITCH of Israel


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BC109 Question
« on: June 20, 2012, 09:27:44 AM »

Hi Smiley
Is it okay to solder BC109s straight onto the breadboard?

Thanks!
Ofek Grin
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Govmnt_Lacky
Posts: 4182


I'M ONLY GETTING CLEAN OUTPUT!!!!


Re: BC109 Question
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2012, 09:36:17 AM »

Personally... I wouldn't solder ANYTHING to a breadboard!  icon_eek

Kinda defeats the purpose doesn't it?  Roll Eyes
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Ofek Deitch
Posts: 196


OFEK DEITCH of Israel


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Re: BC109 Question
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2012, 09:37:13 AM »

Ohh not a breadboard.. a perfboard.. Smiley
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digi2t
Posts: 2506


Burning stuff, since 2009.


Re: BC109 Question
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2012, 09:40:46 AM »

As with soldering any transistor to a board, use a heatsink clip, and be careful on how much heat you apply.
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nocentelli
Posts: 452


leo


Re: BC109 Question
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2012, 10:05:35 AM »

If you're worried about damaging them with heat, they seem pretty resilient. I've built dozens of circuits with them (they're my favourite for fuzz), and on several occasions I have needed to desolder and been pretty heavy-handed with the heat to point at which the metal cap was roasting hot, and they always seem to work afterwards.

Obviously, don't be cavalier but I wouldn't worry too much. There are good reasons to use sockets, but if I'm certain I'm putting it in the right place, and am equally certain I won't want to swap them out, I never use sockets.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2012, 01:29:50 PM by nocentelli » Logged

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Ofek Deitch
Posts: 196


OFEK DEITCH of Israel


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Re: BC109 Question
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2012, 10:35:01 AM »

Thanks!

By the way - I'm building a Fuzz Face right now, and it's my favorite fuzz transistor too.. Grin
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Mark Hammer
Posts: 21488


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Re: BC109 Question
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2012, 11:46:13 AM »

Traditionally, one would be recommended to use a heat sink that looked much like an alligator clip.  Attach the clip to the lead you are soldering, or across all 3, and solder away.  The clip would help to dissipate the heat before it travels all the way up to whatever is encapsulated in the epoxy.
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CynicalMan
Posts: 1613


Alex L. - Canada


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Re: BC109 Question
« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2012, 12:50:40 PM »

I do what Mark suggested, but instead of an alligator clip I use a hemostat as a heatsink:



Hemostats are small surgical forceps that are used to clamp blood vessels. They lock together, so you just clamp them on the transistor pins (on the component side of the board), then solder. They're also great for grabbing and manipulating small components or wires. Hobby or surplus stores often sell them.
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electrosonic
Posts: 471

Andrew


Re: BC109 Question
« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2012, 01:00:04 PM »

A small pair of pliers with and elastic around the handles can serve the same purpose.

Andrew.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2012, 01:18:58 PM by electrosonic » Logged
gritz
Posts: 261

Jonathan G.


Re: BC109 Question
« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2012, 01:11:50 PM »

I do what Mark suggested, but instead of an alligator clip I use a hemostat as a heatsink:



Hemostats are small surgical forceps that are used to clamp blood vessels. They lock together, so you just clamp them on the transistor pins (on the component side of the board), then solder. They're also great for grabbing and manipulating small components or wires. Hobby or surplus stores often sell them.

Good idea. And just the thing to make unwanted guests feel nervous.  Grin
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