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DIY Stompboxes => Building your own stompbox => Topic started by: iam_jrm on September 15, 2019, 12:02:15 PM

Title: Fender Jaguar - Alternative to changing the pots
Post by: iam_jrm on September 15, 2019, 12:02:15 PM
Hi

I have a Jaguar, which obviously can sound like an ice pick due to the 1 Meg pot.

Rather than change the pots in the guitar I would rather build a stomp box with an on/off switch, and a toggle between a 250k or 500k pot/resister.

I have no idea on where to start.

Could some one make me a schematic?

Many thanks
Title: Re: Fender Jaguar - Alternative to changing the pots
Post by: J0K3RX on September 15, 2019, 12:58:51 PM
Why not just install a treble bleed cap/resistor on the volume pot?
Title: Re: Fender Jaguar - Alternative to changing the pots
Post by: amptramp on September 15, 2019, 06:21:09 PM
You could have a buffer with a "suckage" control which is a variable resistor to ground at the input to the buffer.  It should be in series with a resistor so you can't have a situation where you can wipe out all the sound.  The resistance in series with the inductance of the guitar cuts the treble.
Title: Re: Fender Jaguar - Alternative to changing the pots
Post by: j_flanders on September 15, 2019, 06:35:09 PM
a toggle between a 250k or 500k pot/resister.
a variable resistor to ground at the input to the buffer. 
A (variable) resistor to ground, parallel to your volume pot?
As incredible as it may sound you already have exactly that: the tone control on your guitar...

Turning your tone control to 5 (on a linear pot) would sound exactly the same as changing your 1M Ohm volume pot to a 500k Ohm pot.
Turn it to 2,5 and it'll sound like a 250k vol pot, although at that point you'll start to hear the effect of the cap on the tone pot.

It should be in series with a resistor so you can't have a situation where you can wipe out all the sound.
Which is why we have a cap on the tone pot?
The resistance in series with the inductance of the guitar cuts the treble.
The (additional) resistive load lowers the amplitude (Q) of the resonance peak (usually in the treble range).
This is what the tone control on a guitar does.

Additional capacitive load lowers the frequency of the resonance peak.