Author Topic: Guitar Doubling with FV-1  (Read 1447 times)

potul

Guitar Doubling with FV-1
« on: January 26, 2018, 11:16:06 AM »
Hi

The other day I was listening to a demo of the MIMIQ pedal from TC Electronics, and I though on trying to replicate some of the effect using the FV-1

Now my question: In addition to the typical "add a delay and pan it" approach, what else would be required to make the doubling effect? Maybe one cent or two pitch shift? Some modulation?  How to add some randomness?



I'm interested in getting something even in mono.
This guy seems to be working in mono and you can still hear the difference.


bcalla

Re: Guitar Doubling with FV-1
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2018, 01:39:10 PM »
I learned about this site just yesterday.  They have several FV-1 designs including one called Unison Double Tracker.  The 4 controls are detune, delay, mix & volume.  I haven't heard it & there is no demo on the site so it will be hard to say how closely it matches the Mimiq.

I couldn't resist the urge to by the Organ Donor.   ;D   Seems like a cool project.

"Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer."
       -- Mark Twain

ElectricDruid

Re: Guitar Doubling with FV-1
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2018, 02:42:38 PM »
Ok, here goes with some educated guesswork based on what they're saying in that video - marketing stuff like "subtle variations of pitch and delay" etc

It's basically a multi voice chorus unit. If you move the delay time out a bit longer than the typical chorus, you get into the range where you start to hear the individual voices as separate voices rather than as a single "fat" sound. If you were also to pan those voices differently, that would help your ear separate them. You want to turn down the modulation of the delay clocks so that you don't have that seasick warble that chorus can sometimes produce when the delay time is too long and the modulation is too deep - instead, it needs to be very subtle (like they said) so that you can detect the voices are different, but not really hear it as a separate pitch.

That'd be my starting point. It's funny - I've been thinking about building something similar myself. I wanted a super-thick fuzz sound, and was thinking about a chorus-like doubler, with each individual channel taken to separately voiced distortion circuit (one thin and cutting, another heavy and deep maybe). This would help differentiate the two voices a bit more and give the sound of two guitarists following each other really closely. But I was going to use analog delays, not that the choice of technology would make much odds in this case.

HTH,
Tom

potul

Re: Guitar Doubling with FV-1
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2018, 05:08:38 AM »
I learned about this site just yesterday.  They have several FV-1 designs including one called Unison Double Tracker.  The 4 controls are detune, delay, mix & volume.  I haven't heard it & there is no demo on the site so it will be hard to say how closely it matches the Mimiq.

I couldn't resist the urge to by the Organ Donor.   ;D   Seems like a cool project.

Interesting site! Nice spot.
The organ donor looks interesting (although after having owned an EHX C9, I doubt I will ever find an organ sim that appeals to me. I regret having sold it...)
Looking at the description of the double tracker, it's probably trying to emulate the ADT technique made famous by Abbey Road Studios, which at the end is nothing more than a delayed signal with some modulation and detuning.