Author Topic: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names  (Read 7651 times)

ElectricDruid

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #20 on: May 31, 2019, 07:05:38 PM »
Lol, better than 99% of the p0p-sh1te stuff I hear!

Bring on the fish-based music! Everyone join in for the chorus; "She was a fish, she was a fish"!

Fancy Lime

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #21 on: May 31, 2019, 07:11:26 PM »
We play a game in our home called "the Ikea game".  One individual comes up with a name that sounds vaguely Scandinavian to our ears (umlauts are optional), and then you have to determine what the item is, or rather what sort of item the name would be appropriately applied to.  So, for instance a "Stuupen" could be a small kitchen step-up for reached higher cupboards..

I suppose a similar game could be created for pedals.

We can haz competition? Yes pleaze? Like so: we collect a list of the best (weirdest) names and then everyone picks their favorite (multiple people can use the same name, of course) and designs a pedal appropriate to the name. Then we mercilessly judge each other. The winner gets to pat themselves on the back.

Just cutting snippets from peoples postings is also fun:
"pretty much bread and butter" (ElectricDruid)
"dry, sweaty foot" (EBK with talktotransformer.com)
"a quick trip to the garage" (stallik with talktotransformer.com)


Also: Feeding snippets from the Transformer back as new input (with or without modification) produces increasingly bizarre and strangely specific results. Input "My dry, sweaty foot had become"
Quote
My dry, sweaty foot had become the source of one of the most disturbing cases of chemical-based crime within my home country. At first sight, none of the cases seemed to match what she was describing. The crime took place on March 10, 2016. But the events weren't simply "on May Day." The crime involved the release of more than 6 kilograms of chemicals that went through the floorboards of her home in the eastern town of Gansu-Shaan. These chemicals had been found after a three-year investigation by the Federal Public Security Bureau.

Gongyu and her husband Yu Wunghui (要識延) were working as the manager of an air cleaning company in western China's Henan province. Over this period, they worked hard to provide for their family and for them they received a lot of support, the only exception being a visit from a foreign country -- they had to work part-time, in addition to other benefits that Chinese workers in the United States received. As a result, Gongyu had to take on more and more responsibilities on her home.

In a bid to ease home and work situations, her husband purchased her a new home with some improvements, which she described as "a house with a garden." After a while, he began taking care of her, but his home did not have

New input and great pedal name: "one of the most disturbing cases of chemical-based crime"
Quote
one of the most disturbing cases of chemical-based crime, a case of mistaken identity, a case of negligence that goes beyond the bounds of normal human experience."

She then went on to say that, while the investigation into that case remained stalled, other cases showed "a different type of crime" that must be addressed. She continued, saying, "It's the way the law should be enforced."

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The facility, according to The Boston Globe, had been used to produce chemical compounds that were put in food and water after the explosion and the resulting toxicology reports proved that the chemicals were actually "non-biological."

The Department of Justice said in a statement that the FBI and the State Department continued to investigate the case, adding, "Our primary focus is on ensuring that Massachusetts residents are educated and prepared to respond to natural disasters, like those in the state."

[Boston Globe]

This article was updated with comments from Attorney General Dana Boente, State Department press releases, and additional information from the FBI and the Massachusetts General Police.
New pedal names generated:
"normal human experience"
"a different type of crime"
""suspicious" chemical explosion" (mind the air quotes, BTW "mind the air quotes" is also a great pedal name)
"non-human chemicals" (ok, this works better as a band name)


Cheers,
Andy
My dry, sweaty foot had become the source of one of the most disturbing cases of chemical-based crime within my home country.

A cider a day keeps the lobster away, bucko!

Rob Strand

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #22 on: May 31, 2019, 09:41:10 PM »
Quote
But, can it write song lyrics?  Yes!  Just not great ones.....

Input:"Here are the lyrics to my new song, Hagfish:"
Very innovative!
Send:     . .- .-. - .... / - --- / --. --- .-. -

Ripthorn

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #23 on: May 31, 2019, 10:53:38 PM »
My favorite is misanthropic fondue from the oasis of luxury.
Exact science is not an exact science - Nikola Tesla in The Prestige
https://scientificguitarist.wixsite.com/home

rockola

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #24 on: June 01, 2019, 02:28:09 AM »
IKEA play the ikea game too. Apparently, those names mean nothing in any language.
Many (most?) of them do. Quite a few of them are Swedish first names or place names.

stallik

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2019, 05:13:29 AM »
I got my info from a documentary on Ikea. I don’t speak scandiweedish so can’t check. Another myth busted!
Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. Albert Einstein

EBK

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #26 on: June 01, 2019, 07:02:53 AM »
Lol, better than 99% of the p0p-sh1te stuff I hear!

Bring on the fish-based music! Everyone join in for the chorus; "She was a fish, she was a fish"!
This is going to sound weird, but I've got the Hagfish song stuck in my head now.  To me, it sounds a little like the BBC song from the Austin Powers soundtrack:


If you replace the line, "to the BBC" with the line, "And her mouth were big," and replace "BBC1, BBC2, BBC3, ...." with "She was a fish, she was fish, she was a fish,...." maybe you'll start to hear it with me.   :icon_lol:  Apologies in advance.   :icon_razz:
« Last Edit: June 01, 2019, 05:09:05 PM by EBK »
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paul.creedy

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #27 on: June 01, 2019, 09:34:18 AM »


I shall have to use it for my next set of youtube video titles - my current run have all been taken from sci-fi author M John Harrison's blog.

duck_arse

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #28 on: June 01, 2019, 10:09:28 AM »
Input:
"My favorite guitar effect is definitely"

Result:
Quote
My favorite guitar effect is definitely iced, not because it's my favourite but because it brings tears to my eyes. It is absolutely perfect if I have a dry, sweaty foot. (The next day I'd be wearing some kind of sock made of a plastic. No pun intended.) I'll always be searching for iced pedals.


isn't this describing your toe screamer? how did it know?

Mark Hammer

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #29 on: June 01, 2019, 03:21:24 PM »
So, should Electro-Harmonix re-christen the Mole pedal as "All Your Bass Are Belong to Us"?

EBK

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #30 on: June 07, 2019, 01:41:14 PM »
That neural net can also interview itself.  I'm still having a ton of fun with this.  (The first line below was the input)

Quote
Q: What can you tell us about this new fuzz pedal you created?


A: I am a pedal maker from Finland named Jarlson. We made this fuzz pedal to record the sounds of the original Yamaha and Vox AC-30's while we were performing on stage at a Finnish festival. It was the first true fuzz pedal I made myself.


Q: Does it sound cool?


A: As I said, I'm a pedal maker and I created this fuzz for me. As I've mentioned before, it was the first true fuzz pedal I made myself. The bass is a little higher than I'd like on some parts of the record. I've had to add some new bass, however.


Q: Have you used any guitar other than your own in this project?


A: The guitar I played for the record did not help too much in this project. I tried it and it was very comfortable.


Q: What are your current plans for the pedal?


A: All my projects are complete. I currently am working on a new one that I would like to put up on Ebay as well as some more pedal pedals.


For more details about our upcoming projects visit our website: www.meltahoyobuzz.com

That domain name is available if anyone wants to register it.   :icon_lol:
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marcelomd

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #31 on: June 07, 2019, 02:04:10 PM »
But, can it write song lyrics?  Yes!  Just not great ones.....

Input:"Here are the lyrics to my new song, Hagfish:"

Result:
Quote
Here are the lyrics to my new song, Hagfish:
She was a fish
She was a fish,
She was a fish,
She was a fish (I can't remember)
...

In my head it sounds like this:

duck_arse

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #32 on: June 08, 2019, 09:46:18 AM »
EBK - it looks like the questions might have been translated in, answered, and then translated out.

are you building any pedal pedals, or just the other sort? meltahoyo buzz. good name for a pedal pedal.


and the she/fish song sounded to me straight away as "She's A Jar" by Wilco.


EBK

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #33 on: June 08, 2019, 10:34:14 AM »
EBK - it looks like the questions might have been translated in, answered, and then translated out.
Well, Jarlson did explain he's from Finland, so the original interview may have been in Finnish.   :icon_razz:
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Digital Larry

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #34 on: June 08, 2019, 04:30:31 PM »
I'm weeping!  it's beautiful.  I can't write lyrics but now I can!

But, can it write song lyrics?  Yes!  Just not great ones.....

Input:"Here are the lyrics to my new song, Hagfish:"

Result:
Quote
Here are the lyrics to my new song, Hagfish:


She was a fish

She was a fish,

She was a fish,

She was a fish (I can't remember)


A fish with two eyes

She was a fish,

A fish with two eyes

She was a fish.

A fish and her mouth were big

She was a fish,

He called her baby.

She was a fish, she cried.

She was a fish,

He took her to the beach and left her in her shell.

She was a fish, she was a fish
Digital Larry
Want to quickly design your own effects patches for the Spin FV-1 DSP chip?
https://github.com/HolyCityAudio/SpinCAD-Designer

EBK

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #35 on: June 08, 2019, 06:12:34 PM »
I'm officially never going to get bored with this stuff.  The rest of you can ignore this thread when it starts to irritate you too much.  :icon_razz:

In the meantime, it wrote another song:

Quote
Here are the lyrics for my song, Hagfish Too:

A girl who looks like a fish

Brought on by a strange, distant urge

Like fish to go on a fishing adventure

She's just a fish to me

She seems like a fish to me

The fish's in my head

I see the fish in her mind

She's just a fish to me

She seems like a fish to me

The fish's in my head

I see the fish in her mind


That's me


That's me


In my head, she lives

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Digital Larry

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #36 on: June 08, 2019, 06:31:20 PM »
Oh my god I have been in hysterics for the last hour...

Quote
I like my guitar to sound nice and clean. The mandolin is too bright sometimes.
---. became ->>>>>

In some songs the guitar sounds too thin or too slow, which is definitely annoying. Sometimes when playing in a jazz band, I would pick up the instrument by it's neck and push on the head, but other than that the neck is always perfect.

In one of the recordings of "Bitter Sweet Symphony" you play a ton of licks without any specific licks, but I just wanted a solo that was easy to learn and was really different from the rest of the material. The bass licks are really hard to play, but I did it. The way they do it in the songs is I take my neck, bend it into a ball, and then take the strings, hook on the body, and play along through the strings (with the guitar). The guitar players play perfectly without any mistakes and then the musicians on stage can learn the songs together, or the solo is totally different with the singers and the music. All the sounds come together nicely and I never get any of the other players' guitar picking problems. Thanks a ton for your hard work!
Digital Larry
Want to quickly design your own effects patches for the Spin FV-1 DSP chip?
https://github.com/HolyCityAudio/SpinCAD-Designer

Digital Larry

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #37 on: June 08, 2019, 06:50:06 PM »
here are the lyrics to my new song, let's go for a walk
----------------------------------------
'Cause I'll never leave you at 3 a.m.
Now when I get home at 4 p.m.
I always wanna dance your heart out,
So you go down into the basement,

And then I will take you out
and put you out onto the lawn
And then I'm not going to go away,
Cause at 10 p.m. you're going to wake up on my couch

And that's it, my new song, I think I love you
Now I like how you say 'I love you' like you're the only one I remember
'Cause I feel so lucky to be your friend,
Because I can only get you so far,

I guess my new song, 'I love you' so far has been heard by you, my true friend
I hope you love me as well
I think that you've been hearing this song by now for some years
But you just feel lost, you just never know

I've been missing you a long time
That time I thought I'd come along and just hang out and have a drink with you in my house in the winter weather
So all you just have to do is go
Digital Larry
Want to quickly design your own effects patches for the Spin FV-1 DSP chip?
https://github.com/HolyCityAudio/SpinCAD-Designer

EBK

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #38 on: June 08, 2019, 06:54:34 PM »
It will make up recipes too if you give it an input like:

"Ingredients:

1 cup water"


You can also get some wacky DIY project instructions if you give it an input like:

"Step One: "
« Last Edit: June 08, 2019, 07:51:59 PM by EBK »
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Fancy Lime

Re: Letting neural networks come up with new pedal names
« Reply #39 on: June 09, 2019, 08:07:30 AM »
I'm officially never going to get bored with this stuff.  The rest of you can ignore this thread when it starts to irritate you too much.  :icon_razz:
Yepp, me neither.

I wanted to know what to name my new fuzz pedal (hypothetically speaking), so I told transformer "I call my new fuzz pedal the". Apparently, it is going to be called "E.O.D.E." with no explanation whatsoever, what that stands for. Also, I was unaware there are envelope controlled ring modulator vintage acoustic fuzz pedals that change the pitch range when you hit the volume knob at the front:

Quote
I call my new fuzz pedal the E.O.D.E. – It's a small analog fuzz pedal. And it's perfect for my use as a guitar fuzz pedal. Because there's not a lot of fuzz on guitar, you don't have to worry about picking too much noise. You can get just the right amount of fuzz with just an envelope. This pedal has a volume knob at the front, so if you want to switch from one pitch range to another, you just hit the volume knob on the pedal and it goes to that pitch range. In between I've got a ring modulator so I can add distortion or modulation for you. And finally, I have an envelope to make it play like an acoustic guitar fuzz pedal. But it's really good for guitar fuzz.

How does it sound as a guitar fuzz pedal?

It's a real pedal! I tried to write a pedal where it sounded amazing and it sounds as good as anything from the vintage fuzz pedal catalogs – some are really nice.

Have you got any other pedals you'd like to build off this?

Since transformer got me curious why I would name my fuzz pedal E.O.D.E., I entered: "E.O.D.E stands for". This came out:

Quote
E.O.D.E stands for Enhanced Onslaught Damage. The amount of damage is calculated based on the target's health and physical attacks. Note that any bonus damage you receive at levels 1, 2, and 3 that would otherwise increase your physical damage will still do no damage, so your physical is flat-out useless. This will make it hard to really build your physical abilities, or even build your other abilities until you reach the boss fight. The bonuses you receive at level 3 will apply to any abilities you build as you level, but this is because those levels don't affect your physical damage.

Elemental damage [ edit ]

The primary source of elemental damage for EoD Echo Echo is using Elemental Weakness on your target. This can be done either individually or jointly with your weapon or staff. When you use Elemental Weakness you will take damage from any elemental damage type, no matter which. This damage is multiplied by 5% per level to provide a cumulative bonus of 5% damage.

Elemental Weakness affects many targets, specifically the fire. Since this damage is from fire, you do have to make sure you apply it while targeting the fire if your elemental weapon or staff is facing away from the fire, otherwise it will deal damage to everyone else in your party. There is a chance of this damage not reaching you, depending

"Enhanced Onslaught Damage", huh? Pretty good name for a fuzz pedal with the plethora of chaotic noise features it described earlier.

Cheers,
Andy
My dry, sweaty foot had become the source of one of the most disturbing cases of chemical-based crime within my home country.

A cider a day keeps the lobster away, bucko!