Author Topic: Solder lug pot tips  (Read 769 times)

Billyhank

Solder lug pot tips
« on: August 15, 2019, 09:26:52 PM »
Hey, everyone!
 
  Iím building a plexi kit, (Iíve also got a KOT that uses solder lugs too.)and it came with solder lug pots.
Does anyone have any pointers on the best way to get them in correctly?
Iím concerned with height when I solder them onto the board. I donít want them to be too high or low. I can cover the bottoms of the pots so they donít short out.
Iím probably overthinking the issue.
Any tip would be greatly appreciated.

DIY Bass

Re: Solder lug pot tips
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2019, 06:11:24 AM »
Depends on how it all goes together.  The kits I have built with solder lug pots were designed so that you could loosely attach the pots to the case, wiggle it until the PCB would slip nicely over all the lugs, solder them in and then tighten the pot nuts.  Although that is a bit of work to get them in place, if you do have to remove the board you usually don't need to de-solder.  Just undo the nuts and it should all slide in and out.  The ones I had needed you to solder the input/output and power jacks to the PCB first.  They then located into their holes and held the board while the pots and switches were soldered in.  Good luck

Phoenix

Re: Solder lug pot tips
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2019, 06:24:29 AM »
Just to clarify something, as I'm struggling to understand your difficulty, this is a potentiometer with solder lugs, or do you mean some other type?

digi2t

Re: Solder lug pot tips
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2019, 07:03:46 AM »
Use solid core wire.



Doesn't matter if they are PCB pins or solder lug type. If PCB pin type, then just make a hook on the end of the wire, and solder it. If solder lug, then insert it into the hole and solder.

If your pots are "bare backs" (as imaged by Phoenix), then you can either place a piece of sticky foam on the back side, or, make a jig that will lift them off the board to a desired clearance and solder them in. Personally, I like to practice "safe pot", so I buy the ones equipped with condoms from Tayda.

I've been using only the Tayda pots with PCB pins for years now, and I make the pins with AWG20 solid core wire. It's the most cost effective solution I know. This method also allows you to compensate for situations where components with higher deck heights may be present.

Pro tip #1: When soldering the pot to the board, always start with the center lug, with just a tiny bit of solder. Just enough to hold it in place. You can then move the pot around a bit, to get it perfectly centered and parallel to the board. Then solder the two outer pins first, finishing with the center one.

Pro tip #2: Always solder in the pots last. If you have switches on the board, do those first, especially if Alpha type rotary switches are involved. The Alpha's have very high deck heights, so you'll need to jig your pots up even higher than usual. Not something you want to deal with after the fact. :icon_wink:
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Billyhank

Re: Solder lug pot tips
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2019, 08:12:27 AM »
Just to clarify something, as I'm struggling to understand your difficulty, this is a potentiometer with solder lugs, or do you mean some other type?


Yes, that is the type. Iím more used to the pcb mount pots

Billyhank

Re: Solder lug pot tips
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2019, 08:27:46 AM »
Use solid core wire.



Doesn't matter if they are PCB pins or solder lug type. If PCB pin type, then just make a hook on the end of the wire, and solder it. If solder lug, then insert it into the hole and solder.

If your pots are "bare backs" (as imaged by Phoenix), then you can either place a piece of sticky foam on the back side, or, make a jig that will lift them off the board to a desired clearance and solder them in. Personally, I like to practice "safe pot", so I buy the ones equipped with condoms from Tayda.

I've been using only the Tayda pots with PCB pins for years now, and I make the pins with AWG20 solid core wire. It's the most cost effective solution I know. This method also allows you to compensate for situations where components with higher deck heights may be present.

Pro tip #1: When soldering the pot to the board, always start with the center lug, with just a tiny bit of solder. Just enough to hold it in place. You can then move the pot around a bit, to get it perfectly centered and parallel to the board. Then solder the two outer pins first, finishing with the center one.

Pro tip #2: Always solder in the pots last. If you have switches on the board, do those first, especially if Alpha type rotary switches are involved. The Alpha's have very high deck heights, so you'll need to jig your pots up even higher than usual. Not something you want to deal with after the fact. :icon_wink:



Awesome!

Thank you for the tips!!!

Iím so glad I joined this community.

duck_arse

Re: Solder lug pot tips
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2019, 10:38:47 AM »
pro tip #3 - if using tinnned copper wire coming of a roll, stretch it first. wind the free end around something - a screw in your desktop - unwind 'a length' of wire, and then pull on the roll so the length stretches out all the kinks. then cut the length near the roll and cut the wound end from/at the screw.

pro[?] tip #4 - one straight wire, and two with slight kinks in them [use your pliers]. not so big a kink that the wires short w/ each other, but enough that you have some strain relief when they are all soldered, just in case.
Almost forgot the most important thing: Frankie Frankie .......

pi? I prefer cake.

Billyhank

Re: Solder lug pot tips
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2019, 05:14:08 PM »
I donít have solid wire. I was going to use the thick leads from some diodes that arenít useful to me. I bought a bunch in bulk and got a lot that arenít used for pedals. So, I was going to cut the leads and use those.

I do appreciate your help. Iíll be getting some solid wore soon. LOL.