Author Topic: Distortion using odd ICs  (Read 286 times)

Vivek

Distortion using odd ICs
« on: February 23, 2021, 11:52:51 AM »
After seeing distortion circuits made from non-traditional components like Logic IC and Headphone amplifier IC

Anyone made a distortion pedal using other non-traditional IC as the main component ?

like :
Compander IC
GEQ IC
Radio telephony IC
555
4047 and the 4027 ICs
other IC you would not normally associate with a Distortion Pedal ?

EBK

Re: Distortion using odd ICs
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2021, 12:17:18 PM »
I have part of a design on paper for a distortion that uses a LM3914 dot/bar display driver (this is different from my Creaky Floor design that also uses that chip).  I haven't done the proof-of-concept breadboarding yet though, so it is more of an amusing thought than a real circuit at this stage.
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"There is a pestilence upon this land. Nothing is sacred. Even those who arrange and design shrubberies are under considerable economic stress in this period in history." --Roger the Shrubber

Vivek

Re: Distortion using odd ICs
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2021, 01:36:22 PM »

anotherjim

Re: Distortion using odd ICs
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2021, 01:38:26 PM »
I have one using a 723 voltage regulator chip. I fancied doing it when I realized its one of the oldest chips still in production. It's not high gain, but kind of crunchy. It probably needs some extra front end drive, but my aim was to use it alone.
You can get distortion from a voice memo chip, just leave the AGC capacitor off and fix it for pass-thru mode instead of recorder mode. You get a variable LP filter too set by the recording time resistor.


Croeso i Diystompboxes.

iainpunk

Re: Distortion using odd ICs
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2021, 04:56:56 PM »
i have a 555 based fuzz!
its basically a Jfet boost, biased really close to the threshold of the trigger input (2) and the circuit around the rest of the 555 is basically the 2nd half of the Atari Punk Console.
this gives you a max frequency threshold, it sounds best when the frequency is set around 700hz to 1k. it produces glitchy octaves and other intervals DOWN when you play above the set threshold.



cheers
half man - half snail - 6 feet to scale - Snail man's - not frail - He's been - to jail
snail man [x11]
snail man is fuccing real

ElectricDruid

Re: Distortion using odd ICs
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2021, 06:18:57 PM »
A bit like Iainpunk describes, I breadboarded a fuzz-thing based on a 4516 4-bit counter. By setting the bias close to the logic threshold, you get a gated fuzz. Best part? You get 4 octaves of gated fuzz going down and down and down!

Andon

Re: Distortion using odd ICs
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2021, 06:42:41 PM »
The Dirge Slowly Melting is a great example of this; basically pushing a PT2399 way past where it wants to go:

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Vivek

Re: Distortion using odd ICs
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2021, 12:38:53 PM »
The Dirge Slowly Melting is a great example of this; basically pushing a PT2399 way past where it wants to go:



Wow, Thanks

Did anyone actually record a song using this ?
(In a non science fiction setting)

iainpunk

Re: Distortion using odd ICs
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2021, 03:10:57 PM »
The Dirge Slowly Melting is a great example of this; basically pushing a PT2399 way past where it wants to go:

[the video used to be here, but i want to save space]
i really love that sound! i ''need'' one! i think that would go perfect in my noise-pop project, just add jangly guitar/ukulele and 8 bit drums.

cheers
half man - half snail - 6 feet to scale - Snail man's - not frail - He's been - to jail
snail man [x11]
snail man is fuccing real