Author Topic: Breadboarding the NPN boost  (Read 6067 times)

stratking

Breadboarding the NPN boost
« on: October 21, 2003, 10:06:11 PM »
I've been following all the threads here and am getting ready to order the parts.  I picked up a breadboard from Radio Shack a few weeks ago but haven't done anything with it.  I haven't used a breadboard in quite a while and don't really know how to hook one up.  The only time I ever used one, it was a big, self powered one and I was just IC chips.  With this small one, I don't really know how to power the board and get the power to the components.  If someone could maybe breadboard this project and take some pics for me I would be greatly appreciative.  

Thanks,

stratking

Chris R

Breadboarding the NPN boost
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2003, 08:55:27 AM »
you'll need to get a 9 volt battery clip.. then the wires off of that clip will be your positive & negative.  

Just stick those wires in the board somewhere.  I usually like to connect the positive to the 'red' line thats all the way down one side of the breadboard.  Likewise the negative goes to the blue line.

Then you can just connect the relevant components to the + and - .

In the case of the NPN Boost the 10k resistor at the top of the schematic... and the 100K on the lower left will come right off the + 9v.

Hope this helps..

Chris

stratking

Breadboarding the NPN boost
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2003, 08:17:28 PM »
For some reason I'm just not getting this.  I'm trying to get everything on the board but just can't figure out where to put stuff.  I started off with the 0.1uF cap and from there get lost   :oops:   I would try to explain it but it would be very confusing.  I am going to try to snag a dig. camera from work to show everyone but don't have one yet.  If anyone could post any pics of this or even any other similar circuits breadboarded, I would be very appreciative.

Thanks,

stratking

aron

Breadboarding the NPN boost
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2003, 02:33:09 PM »
Breadboarding IS confusing. It took me a while before I was able to do it ok.

Take your time and build it one step at a time. Do you understand how the breadboard is laid out?

stratking

Breadboarding the NPN boost
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2003, 09:18:55 PM »
Thats my problem, I sort of know how it's laid out but just don't know how to connect it all up.  I know that each column has is connected together with a strip going down it.  The board I have is the generic RS board with like 3 rows on the top and bottom section and about 8 or so rows in the center two sections.  Let me try to explain how I was trying to set it up.

I started off with the 0.1uF cap in the top row of the first 8 row section, say column 3, so its leads are in column 3 and for.  Seeing that it then goes to both the 10k resistor and the transistor, I put the first lead of the 10k res. in the 4th column, right under the the 0.1uF cap.  Then under that I put the first pin of the transistor.  I followed the rest of the schematic but know I was doing it wrong because everything was clumped together and a mess.  As you can tell it would be a lot easier if I had a camera but unfortunately I don't.  

This probably doesn't tell you too much but that's how I was trying to go about it.  Any advice would help a lot.

stratking

tonepoet

Breadboarding the NPN boost
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2003, 03:23:12 AM »
Hi Stratking,
     I really suck at this stuff, so here's what I did. I made sure that I had all of my parts. The first time, I bought a rather large breadboard and started putting things wherever, at least how they looked to ME on the schematic. After a while, before I even had the knobs hooked up or jacks or pots, it had taken up the whole board and was a mess of solder and sloppy wires. I thought, 'this sucks, but I won't give up'. I unsoldered all the the parts (using de-soldering braid or whatever it's called), threw out all the parts except for the board and bought all new parts. I also bought a smaller board, the one that snaps into 2 very small boards and figured I could try to make it work. This time, I went to the build pictorial and took note of EVERYTHING that Aron did, one tiny small step at a time. I counted the holes around his first capacitor on every side and put mine in the exact same place. I did this for EVERY component. You know how most people say that finished this project in 2 hours or less. Well, I started mine at 7 in the evening and finished at 4 the next morning!!! I found at least 2 shortcuts to the wiring, not by much. When I was finished with the first part of it, I had used less space than Aron and even had enough room to create a central point for all of the grounds to connect to, hooked the LED and resistor to the board, pretty much everything and neatly. Just take your time, it doesn't have to be a speed record. I promise, if you do it this way, you WILL NOT fail!! You don't have to do everything in one day, though!! I had a lot of time to waste. Good luck!
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