Author Topic: The Battery  (Read 7548 times)

DaKurt

The Battery
« on: February 02, 2004, 12:39:34 PM »
A little question. When I don't have the in and output cable connected into my effect (which doesn't have a on-off button yet) does the 9V Battery discharge (sp?) ? And when the cables are connected and I don't play, then the battery dischages right? And then, the last question. When I build in this DPDT footswitch, and the pedal is off, does it consume batterypower?!

Dumb questions, but I would like to know that.

smoguzbenjamin

The Battery
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2004, 12:57:55 PM »
If you wired the black battery lead to the sleeve treminal of the input jack, then the battery won't discharge unless there's a plug in the input jack. In all other situations(that is when there's a plug in the input jack), the battery discharges.
I don't like Holland. Nobody has the transistors I want.

DaKurt

The Battery
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2004, 02:44:08 PM »
ok thanks

aron

The Battery
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2004, 03:44:23 PM »
These are good questions and the battery switch issue is covered in the FAQ. (Check out the FAQ forum).

As Ben said, if you wire your stereo input jack like described in the FAQ, power is not used when the pedal is unplugged. It is used whenever the pedal is plugged in. The DPDT only works on the signall (with the exception of the LED if used) and does not switch the power on and off.

Triffid

The Battery
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2004, 04:53:02 PM »
I have been wondering about that... what is the reason for not switching battery power off when the effect is bypassed?  I assume it is because it will cause unwanted effects when switching... but i'm not sure?

aron

The Battery
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2004, 11:39:56 PM »
There can be problems with timing while the circuit charges up or down. Most of our circuits draw so little current that they can go for a long time so no problem. It's one of those things that _seems_ logical at first glance, but after a while of practical testing, you leave it alone.

As a test, plug your circuit into an amp. Now unplug and plug back in the battery and see if you hear a pop, or thud etc.... Now that's what you are going to hear everytime you turn on and off your circuit.

Now you need to charge the circuit up before switching the audio or else you might get this noise through your amp. Well, hopefully you get the idea.

Triffid

The Battery
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2004, 09:03:38 AM »
That is the reason I was expecting... I just had never tried it before.  Thanks for the verification.

hendrixrules

The Battery
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2004, 02:32:05 PM »
im using a mon jack for input , when the effect is bypassed will it drain the battery? (sorry if this has already been answeared!)
"It was working a minute ago!"

Triffid

The Battery
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2004, 02:33:44 PM »
Unless you shut the power off while switched... I think it will, unless you have come up with some genius method to cut power without a stereo input jack.

smoguzbenjamin

The Battery
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2004, 04:07:46 PM »
You can use an SPST switch to break one of the battery connections, but you'll have to remember to turn it off.
I don't like Holland. Nobody has the transistors I want.

aron

The Battery
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2004, 03:24:49 AM »
Yes, the Big Muff used to use a switch to turn the power on/off.

Triffid

The Battery
« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2004, 08:51:08 AM »
That is one thing I never understood...  By using a stereo jack, you have to remember to pull the cord out when you are done.  It seems you either have to remember to pull the cord, or flip a switch.  And flipping the switch at least lets you keep your rig together.  I would almost rather have an on/off switch on my pedals.

aron

The Battery
« Reply #12 on: February 04, 2004, 11:12:11 AM »
Then great. Use a mono jack and a switch to turn the power on/off.

Aron

smoguzbenjamin

The Battery
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2004, 11:30:58 AM »
Yeah, no problem in that whatsoever. Right now I have a daisy-chain so I don't even have any batteries in my pedals ;)
I don't like Holland. Nobody has the transistors I want.

Triffid

The Battery
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2004, 11:49:28 AM »
ya, the non-battery approach seems a lot cleaner.  I was mostly wondering about commercial pedals I buy that have the input jack switch.  Do they do that because everyone else does, or because most people actually prefer it?

hendrixrules

The Battery
« Reply #15 on: February 13, 2004, 03:27:40 PM »
is there a non batery aproach that does not include plugging your pedal into the wall, or am i just being naive :?
"It was working a minute ago!"

Triffid

The Battery
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2004, 04:09:34 PM »
:shock:  Well... I sure can't think of any other way abundent means of getting power.  Maybe you could carry around a little gas powered generator or something to power your pedals.  That might be a little noisy though  :wink:

smoguzbenjamin

The Battery
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2004, 04:59:29 AM »
The idea of having the input jack switch the battery, is that you can't drain your battery when the pedal is lying on the shelf or lazing about on your pedalboard. It just makes sense, otherwise there would have to be a battery switch someplace, which people would forget even more quickly than unplugging the pedal.

I definately prefer input jack switching :)
I don't like Holland. Nobody has the transistors I want.

Triffid

The Battery
« Reply #18 on: February 14, 2004, 04:36:46 PM »
They both make sense... maybe to be "pedal board" friendly it would be nice to have both the input switch and a flip switch.  I guess on a pedal board you probably want to have a "master power" switch anyway.

smoguzbenjamin

The Battery
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2004, 04:05:13 AM »
The thing is, on a pedalboard you generally use a wallwart. When you plug in a DC jack, the battery is disconnected anyway. So you don't have to dismantle you pedalboard everytime ;)
I don't like Holland. Nobody has the transistors I want.