Author Topic: PCB design  (Read 316 times)

SprinkleSpraycan

PCB design
« on: February 01, 2023, 05:20:32 PM »
I would like to get pcb's printed but I'm new to this. What program should I use for design? Or can I submit a schematic and have it designed as well? All suggestions are welcome.

bartimaeus

Re: PCB design
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2023, 05:44:28 PM »
try kicad if you want to design your own. but it takes work to learn it well, if you want to make a low-noise layout.

if you want a pcb designed from your schematic, you'll need to pay someone to do that for you. maybe it's more cost effective to do that, depends on your situation.

mark2

Re: PCB design
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2023, 10:20:08 PM »
In addition to KiCAD, which is great, you'll find EasyEDA has a pretty shallow learning curve. If you spend about 20 minutes going through their tutorials, you'll be ready to make your first PCB.

It's a web-based tool and tied to their PCB fab house, JLCPCB, which is the cheapest place I know of it get boards produced. Quality is fine for pedals.

POTL

Re: PCB design
« Reply #3 on: Yesterday at 05:41:19 PM »
Diptrace is good enough

ElectricDruid

Re: PCB design
« Reply #4 on: Today at 08:29:12 AM »
Diptrace is good enough

I use Diptrace and like it too. It makes more sense that some other schematic/PCB packages I've used, which tended to be very obscure and slightly bizarre - plenty of "Wait? You do what?!?" moments. My Diptrace copy is paid-for though, and I can't any longer remember what the limitations are on the free version. I used that for several years, and I had a good deal for a while when I was working in Education too. It's definitely worth checking out.

Ice-9

Re: PCB design
« Reply #5 on: Today at 03:34:27 PM »
Diptrace- Very easy to learn and produces gerber file that fabrication factories can use. I have Diptrace for quite some time. There is a 'non profit' version that allows 2 layers and 500 pins which is more than enough for most pedals.
I would say though, no matter what layout program used the autoroute option are not good. I find it best to manually route.
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ElectricDruid

Re: PCB design
« Reply #6 on: Today at 05:22:37 PM »
I would say though, no matter what layout program used the autoroute option are not good. I find it best to manually route.

Gawd, yes, agree 100%. Perhaps if you pay thousands you get an autorouter that can do a decent job. On my budget, I've certainly never seen one. Stay away.

bean

Re: PCB design
« Reply #7 on: Today at 07:53:40 PM »
I'm still on pre-Autodesk EagleCAD 7.7 because it does everything I need to do and I purchased a permanent license (I hate the subscription model). You should be able to find 7.7 as a freeware installation which is limited in board size and has no autorouter (which you should not be using anyway for guitar pedal PCBs) but perfectly serviceable for layouts Or, whatever their newest freeware version is (I think it's 9.6 or something).

If you go that route, you can download my Eagle library here which I use to design all my PCBs. It's based on the Gaussmarkov library from a decade or so ago and I've added to it continuously with many custom parts and modifications. I'll be releasing v4 later on this year.

If you want to go KiCAD, a member created a port of the mbp Eagle library for it. It can be found here: https://www.madbeanpedals.com/forum/index.php?topic=30576.msg311283#msg311283

And, as others have mentioned: JLCPCB is great! Cheap and generally no issues. OSHPark is another company that can do small run, high quality boards. Can't go wrong with either those guys.

SprinkleSpraycan

Re: PCB design
« Reply #8 on: Today at 09:30:00 PM »
Thanks guys. Lots to look into.