Author Topic: Not sure if I got this completely right.  (Read 8545 times)

H4T

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« on: May 14, 2005, 07:15:50 PM »
I built the circuit, got the perfboard all soldered up with parts and then wired up the input and output jacks and plugged in my guitar. Since I haven't figured out how to ground yet I hold all three ground wires in my hand and hit some random notes on the guitar with the other, lol.

The volume is great, and the tone is fine, however it sounds no different than if I plug my guitar straight into my amp. I heard a sound clip from someone else and they had some pretty sweet distortion, but I'm not sure if that was from this pedal or from something else. I wired the pot and when I turn it all the way up the only difference I hear is a slight "fart" from the notes I strike, lol. It literally is still clean and everything, it just kind of distorts a very tiny bit, making an almost farting sound. Any ideas on what is going on?

So I was just wondering, does this pedal simply boost clean tone is some really subtle way, or does it also distort? Also, do I simple connect all my ground wires to the negative terminal of the battery, or what?

aron

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2005, 12:09:52 AM »
Sounds like something is not right. You cannect the wires like this:

http://diystompboxes.com/sboxforum/viewtopic.php?t=970

H4T

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2005, 09:28:08 AM »
Well I'm broke, and even if I wasn't it would take a couple weeks for me to get a 3PDT switch, and I was trying to test the board out before I spent more money on it.

I was going off the image below to connect things off the board. Do you think it would work if I went through all the trouble to put in the 3PDT switch? I was hoping the off board connections would at least tell me if I got it right or not.


aron

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2005, 02:20:44 PM »
Can you check the orientation of your transistor? I wonder if maybe it's in backwards?

Otherwise, it could be a mistake in wiring.

H4T

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2005, 03:26:59 PM »
I checked the transistor and it is oriented properly, but just in case I flipped it around and tried it the other way around and got the same results. Maybe my transistor is bad or something, I don't know.

I went off this picture, showing the transistor from the bottom. I have a 2N2222A transistor, looks like the TO18, TO39 type.


I'm thinking that maybe it is the transistor and I blew it somehow, since the signal is getting through fine, but nothing is happening to it, which is the transistor's job, isn't it?

What SHOULD I be hearing if I get a working transistor? Louder clean tone, or distortion or what?

H4T

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2005, 09:58:17 PM »
Ah, I read online that transistors are easily damanged by heat, so what is the correct way to solder transistors?

KORGULL

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2005, 10:39:00 PM »
Best way to avoid heat damage is by using sockets. Solder the socket & just plug in the transistor later. If you can't get a socket, then try to get the transistor soldered quickly - don't hold the iron on it for more than about five seconds. Use adequate heat and a solder that melts easily. You can use an alligator clip as a heat sink across the transistor's legs while you are soldering.

aron

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2005, 06:06:41 AM »
Yes, that's why I used a socket in the example.

Can you post a picture of the top and bottom of your circuit?

H4T

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2005, 05:55:38 PM »
Hm, yeah I most definately did kill the transistor then. I wish I knew that lol.

I'm not sure how much help these pics will be, but let me know. I took the transistor out in these pics, since it was broke and all, but the socket is there.

FRONT



BACK

aron

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2005, 06:10:26 PM »
Hey, you know. Not a bad job at all for the first time.

One tip, the wire goes in from the top adjacent to the spot you want to solder it to. Then you simply bend the wire to touch the spot and solder.

BTW: You don't solder the transistor into the socket, you simply push it in.

Do you have another transistor to try with?

Aron

H4T

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2005, 07:00:27 PM »
Yay, thanks ^_^

Yes I have another, but I fear I may have busted it as well, or maybe confused it with the other, lol. Plus, the three DIP holes all still full of solder, haha, I may have to buy a solder sucker to get it out :\

I'm going to buy some 3PDT switches from you soon, so if I bought the "Thirty 2N5089 Transistors" from your store as well, would they work just fine?

About the wires, I think I get what you mean...like poke the joint with the wire vertically (vertically meaning the wire is perpendicular to the board), then solder it, and afterward bend it to wherever instead of having the wires flat like they are?

aron

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2005, 09:36:55 PM »
Yes, push the wire in from the component side of the board (strip it first), then bend the lead to touch where you have it now. That way the wire comes out of the "top" of the board.

Check your PM.

aron

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2005, 09:38:53 PM »
Oh, I want to warn you that you are perilously close to being "hooked" on this hobby.  :wink:

H4T

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2005, 09:31:18 PM »
Ok, I got the new transistors, but first I must remove the solder I put in the DIP socket holes, lol. Till then, don't know.

However I'm stuck right now because I have four ground wires (from the board, the two jacks and the pot) and I don't know what to do with them. I tried soldering them all together and then to the negative side of the battery and it didn't work. What should I do?

aron

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2005, 01:19:09 AM »
If you are not using a switch, wire it up exactly like this says:


H4T

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2005, 08:26:31 PM »
Alright, this thing is really bugging the living crap out of me. I wired up the ground wires correctly and replaced the stereo jack (the 1/4" cable wasn't fitting properly in the jack) and now it won't work. However, whenever the pot is turned all the way down and my amp is turned all the way up I hear a small sound, so signal is getting through...sort of.

Gah, I think since I got those new transistors and some extra parts I'm going to rebuild the entire thing >_< But I'd love this one to work, lol. I'd take a pic and post it, but I don't have a camera anymore :\

H4T

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #16 on: May 30, 2005, 04:27:28 PM »
w00t!

I got it to work! Now I gotta buy a case, a 3PDT switch, an LED....damnit....

aron

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #17 on: May 30, 2005, 10:16:49 PM »
OK, you cannot get away that easily.

What was wrong???  :)

H4T

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2005, 10:57:47 PM »
Hehe, I kept being a tard and frying transistors :P So I went out to RadioShack, bought some alligator clips and a desolder braid (finally) and got that transistor in there properly. Now it works, lol.

Plus, I got the wires hooked up correctly, I had it pretty different (and wrong) before, so once I got the ground wires all hooked up right it worked.

At least I hope I got it it. Is this pedal simply a slight volume boost? When the pot is turned down, normal volume goes through, when its turned up I get the same tone, but a slight bit louder..

Hal

Not sure if I got this completely right.
« Reply #19 on: May 31, 2005, 09:35:09 AM »
sounds like you're probably using a solid state amp?

depending on the amp, most boosts might either do this, or push the amp to overdrive.   Its more likely to do this to a tube amp.  I think it has sometihing to do with input impedance, but someone else could tell you better.