Author Topic: Software-based stompboxes  (Read 15505 times)

amz-fx

Software-based stompboxes
« on: November 17, 2005, 08:01:12 PM »
This is a nice looking collection of effects from Guitar Rig 2:



regards, Jack

vanessa

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2005, 08:06:37 PM »
They make a great 21st century practice amp, and are cool for recording at home, etc. I've got the first version of it and it got me to sell my Line 6 POD v.2.0. I thought the POD sounded very realistic on recordings this thing is amazing!

Now if they could just add a Binson Echorec to it...

 :icon_lol:

vanessa

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2005, 08:10:03 PM »
I would also bet the tracking on that Whammy take-off will be amazing as well. Some people might reconsider dropping crazy cash for the original on eBay!

troubledtom

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2005, 08:10:21 PM »
ohhh, hell yes!
 -tt

Fp-www.Tonepad.com

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2005, 08:28:31 PM »
 :icon_mrgreen:

Fp
www.tonepad.com : Effect PCB Layout artwork classics and originals : www.tonepad.com

troubledtom

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2005, 09:08:16 PM »
laptop[ computer ] into the board metal :icon_twisted: in the studio and live, if you wanted or had to.............!
              hmmmmmmmmmmmm
                      - tt

A.S.P.

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2005, 02:11:14 AM »
ooops - I stomped on the button, and now I gotta buy a new display...  :icon_lol:
Analogue Signal Processing

Transmogrifox

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2005, 02:25:29 AM »
Half the joy of analog FX is in being surrounded by a circle of pedals that you can  stomp on aggressively.  Knobs bend, paint chips, jacks get loose, and the pedal sounds as good as the day you got it.  Computer programs don't gain character with age, they gain bugs.

I have to admit it's pretty cool, though.  There's been a lot of work and brilliant programming that's gone into this stuff.  I'm just waiting for someone to come out with a realtime version of SPICE so I can built digitally modeled analog circuits and experiment as if it's a breadboard--then see if I can build a real circuit if it sounds good.
trans∑mog∑ri∑fy
tr.v. trans∑mog∑ri∑fied, trans∑mog∑ri∑fy∑ing, trans∑mog∑ri∑fies To change into a different shape or form, especially one that is fantastic or bizarre.

whitewave

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2005, 02:56:17 AM »
 I'm using Guitar Rig at home, for practicing and some recordings.  I don't have their pedalboard, but I use the software and plug guitar into PC through a Line 6 Guitar Port (latency is about 10-12 ms, maybe too much for stdying, but good for recording).
 Sound quality is amazing, I was totally surprised the first time I listened to it. 

 Do you know anyone using it live?  I guess in some years we'll go on stage with a laptop, a cab sim and obviously a guitar.
Just curiosity.

 Thanks.

JimRayden

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2005, 03:54:05 AM »
I guess in some years we'll go on stage with a laptop, a cab sim and obviously a guitar.
Just curiosity.

This forum exists to prevent that. Some of us are still true to the good ol' analogue system, otherwise we wouldn't be here in the first place.

------------
Jimbo

Paul Perry (Frostwave)

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2005, 05:50:29 AM »
I guess in some years we'll go on stage with a laptop, a cab sim and obviously a guitar.

The guitar isn't so 'obvious': http://airguitar.tml.hut.fi/

B Tremblay

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2005, 07:12:31 AM »
There's a demo (30 days, 30 minute limit per session, some features disabled) available for download here:
http://www.nativeinstruments.de/index.php?guitarrig2_us

It's a 35MB download, so dial-up users will have a long wait.

I downloaded it and played for about an hour (two sessions) last night.
B Tremblay
runoffgroove.com

Johan

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2005, 08:22:30 AM »
I guess in some years we'll go on stage with a laptop, a cab sim and obviously an air-guitar.

..sorry..couldnt resist the urge to edit the quote.... :icon_twisted:

johan
DON'T PANIC

Mark Hammer

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #13 on: November 18, 2005, 09:07:07 AM »
What the hell kind of monitor do have that you can do a screen dump like that?!!!   :icon_lol:

Gotta love the way the modules try to allude to commercial products without stepping over the trademark line.

birt

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #14 on: November 18, 2005, 09:18:33 AM »
I guess in some years we'll go on stage with a laptop, a cab sim and obviously a guitar.
Just curiosity.

This forum exists to prevent that. Some of us are still true to the good ol' analogue system, otherwise we wouldn't be here in the first place.

------------
Jimbo

keep it reel man :icon_mrgreen:
http://www.last.fm/user/birt/
visit http://www.effectsdatabase.com for info on (allmost) every effect in the world!

tommy.genes

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2005, 10:33:16 AM »
I actually tried a gig once - just once - using my laptop as an effects processor. While the routing and control possibilities were literally endless, setup, teardown and control were just way too complicated and there was just too much that could go wrong. And, in the end, the more exotic effects ended up getting lost in the mix anyway.

And besides, the feeling of building your own analog pedal and peforming with it is great. It's just so much more visceral to torment poor little transistors and diodes than it is to crunch numbers.

If I had oodles of surplus cash and time, I might check out a dedicated VST-running platform such as the Muse Research Receptor or the uber-expensive stuff from Open Labs. Or maybe the Nord Modular.

But, alas, I do not have oodles of surplus cash or time...

-- T. G. --
"A man works hard all week to keep his pants off all weekend." - Captain Eugene Harold "Armor Abs" Krabs

MartyMart

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2005, 10:53:55 AM »
I do have some reservations about this stuff, but saying that, I've had a "Pod" for years !
I use "Amplitude" which I'm very impressed with and a friend of mine, who is one
"Serious" player, uses his Pod XT a lot and gets great results in the studio.
Guitar rig II looks like a winner, I also like the look of the new Line 6 "Tone port"
The version with two inputs/VU's and several gtr/bass/mic models.
That's a USB recording front end and does have a latency issue .... !

It just keeps getting better and better  ,,  :icon_eek:

Marty.
"Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm"
My Website www.martinlister.com

Gringo

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2005, 10:55:28 AM »
If you have a cheesy onboard sound card with no asio drivers:

http://www.asio2ks.de/index.html

Then, use a ¬ buffer/booster (i use my almighty amz mosfet boost) from guitar to mic/line in input, and that's it.

Guitar rig is the one i liked best of these stuff, with Amplitube a close second. The Native Instruments Guitar Combos is quite good too.
Cut it large, and smash it into place with a hammer.
http://gringo.webhop.net

vanessa

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2005, 11:45:17 AM »
I do have some reservations about this stuff, but saying that, I've had a "Pod" for years !
I use "Amplitude" which I'm very impressed with and a friend of mine, who is one
"Serious" player, uses his Pod XT a lot and gets great results in the studio.


What's funny is I saw Elvis Costello do one of those "The Story Behind the Song" shows. On stage it was just him a vintage single coil Danelectro surrounded by some effects pedals a new Boss drum machine/sampler and for his amp he used a POD XT. He laughed about how much the technologies have changed since he first started. Back in the day Costello would not be seen with anything less than all the coolest vintage equipment you’ve ever seen. I was in shock!

Weezer use POD's live and in the studio.

Kid Rock, Sheryl Crow, Metallica in the studio as well as a ton of others these days.

You might not use it as the main amp on the track. But they are very useful for layering and double tracking. D.I. your guitarist to the board and to the amp. After the final take output the clean D.I. to the POD or the NI Guitar Rig and start layering.

By the way the Guitar Rig sounds a lot better than the POD and Amplitube in terms of amps, but they are really good. The Guitar Rig is really on to something being a few steps ahead of the rest. If you use a buffer before input and you use (like the man said) a top quality sound card the results are amazing. Some of the effects are so-so on guitar rig but the amps, reverbs, tremolo are very convincing.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2005, 11:47:05 AM by vanessa »

tommy.genes

Re: Software-based stompboxes
« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2005, 11:55:57 AM »
Since this thread got me thinking about it, I was digging a little deeper into the Muse Research Receptor site, and I learned (or re-learned) that it includes a guitar-specific input on the front, and it can run Guitar Rig. Would probably be a much more reliable platform for running GR than a general-purpose computer. (See "This WINDOWS POS" thread in the lounge.)

-- T. G. --
"A man works hard all week to keep his pants off all weekend." - Captain Eugene Harold "Armor Abs" Krabs