Author Topic: i am new in DSP and i need help  (Read 4037 times)

GT2

i am new in DSP and i need help
« on: June 11, 2006, 01:58:08 PM »
know how to program on c(low level) and i want to learn how program guitar effect on the 8086 microprocessor where can i learn it?
please give me simple as possible sites.
thank you!

GT2

Re: i am new in DSP and i need help
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2006, 03:51:17 PM »
No one knows where to begin?
How did you started?
And i forgot to say i also know a little assembly (asm-86) to not only c...

Peter Snowberg

Re: i am new in DSP and i need help
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2006, 11:41:52 AM »
DSP is complex and not something you can just jump into without a great deal of study.

The 8086 is a general purpose microprocessor and it lacks the fast hardware multiplier required for DSP. Most of the time you need a real DSP to do DSP. The primary differences between a DSP and a general purpose CPU are the addition of the MAC (Multiply-ACcumulate) instruction, but many chips also include features that add resolution to calculations such as a wider accumulator register. For example the DSP56K series from Freescale has a 24 bit data width but a 56 bit wide accumulator.

To do simple DSP, see the post in this forum titled "cheap DSP" which uses an Atmel AVR microcontroller. While the AVR is not a DSP, it does include a fast hardware multiplier. http://www.diystompboxes.com/smfforum/index.php?topic=43177.0

This link has enough sources to keep you reading for a long time. :)
http://www.epanorama.net/links/dsp.html
Eschew paradigm obfuscation

GT2

Re: i am new in DSP and i need help
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2006, 12:42:15 PM »
Thanks you helped a lot!

Transmogrifox

Re: i am new in DSP and i need help
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2006, 03:46:31 AM »
Yeah, I'd agree with petemoore about doing DSP with a microprocessor.   It's amazing the amount of number-crunching that can be done on these DSP's in such a short order.  I did a little programming on an Analog Devices DSP (I think it was an ADSP-2191); this chip could do a multiply and accumulate in a single clock cycle, and this wasn't the top-of-the-heap DSP either.

I hope you do find a good bit of information on the link that petemoore gave you.  Pay attention to IIR filters (and FIR filters, for that matter) and learn that stuff.  Very little of DSP is the programming of the chip.  Much of DSP is to determine WHAT it is you need to program into the chip to make it do what you want.
trans·mog·ri·fy
tr.v. trans·mog·ri·fied, trans·mog·ri·fy·ing, trans·mog·ri·fies To change into a different shape or form, especially one that is fantastic or bizarre.

Peter Snowberg

Re: i am new in DSP and i need help
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2006, 04:07:36 AM »
Petemoore???

Not that I mind being mixed up with Pete. :icon_surprised:  He's a good guy. :icon_cool:

There are quite a number of people name Peter here it seems.


I should add one thing about the AVR and multiplying... Not all of the AVRs have hardware multipliers and the one used in that project is one that does not include one. Nevertheless, AVRs are fast enough to do some basic DSP thanks to their RISC architecture.
Eschew paradigm obfuscation

Transmogrifox

Re: i am new in DSP and i need help
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2006, 11:41:48 PM »
Petemoore???

LOL.  Now I feel like a nimrod for that mixup. 

I think I may have to convert to AVR's before I get too deep into Microchip.  PICs are nice and cute and all, but I do truly covet the ability to get an instruction per clock cycle such as the AVR's for applications such as simple DSP.
trans·mog·ri·fy
tr.v. trans·mog·ri·fied, trans·mog·ri·fy·ing, trans·mog·ri·fies To change into a different shape or form, especially one that is fantastic or bizarre.