Author Topic: Yet another Hammerite question.  (Read 4125 times)

jpm83

Yet another Hammerite question.
« on: February 16, 2008, 12:01:00 PM »
I just bought a small can of Hammerite paint for my next project. My question is that can I paint the box in my bathroom or will the fumes be too much? I live in a 28 square meter single apartment. I can't really paint outdoors now here in Finland, because the outdoors temperature is right now something like -15 degrees Celsius and I'm not sure if here is some sort of hobby room in the building I'm living in. 

Janne

foxfire

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2008, 12:16:54 PM »
i would but i don't pay much mind about my health and the like. do you have a vent in your bathroom?

jpm83

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2008, 12:56:58 PM »
I have tiny window in there and smallish vent on the sealing. I'm asking because a couple of years ago I made a CD-rack for my sister and clear coated it indoors (in kitchen) at my parents with nitrocellulose  lacquer. The fumes were so bad that I had after a couple of weeks a rose (I don't know the accurate name for this decease, it's same virus that makes the chicken box) to my face.

Janne

EDIT: And I don't mean that STD kind of herpes. But I can tell my face was on fire for couple of weeks.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2008, 01:07:24 PM by jpm83 »

foxfire

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2008, 01:11:20 PM »
well it isn't the smartest thing to do be if you have a window, a vent, and no other good options then just be smart about it. like spray towards the open window and light coats allowing the room to air out before you do the next coat. i did a box last week were i sprayed it outside and then hung it in my dinning room between coats to dry. sure it stunk but it went away eventually.

jpm83

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2008, 01:18:43 PM »
Is there any difference between that spray on stuff and brush on stuff. Because my hammerite is brush apply kind stuff.

Janne

chris_d

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2008, 01:23:52 PM »
Nitrocellulose laquer is especially stinky and nasty, but your previous experience with it might indicate that you have a preexisting sensitivity to those types of fumes. With that in mind, you should take much more caution about painting anything else in your apartment with spraycans, IMO.

In your case, i don't think i would do it in the bathroom or anywhere in the apartment. Unless you don't mind having an allergic reaction that will hang around for a week, along with the stench.

Hammerite paint works best with a medium heavy coating. Depending on how big your enclosure is, that could be a big mess in your bathroom, and a lot of fumes. I would either find someplace (like a friends house with a garage) else or wait for warmer weather.

Myself, i only do very little painting in the winter time. I save projects up until i can open all the windows in the basement or just shoot outside. And i don't break out in a rash from the stuff either!

-chris

chris_d

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2008, 01:27:29 PM »
Is there any difference between that spray on stuff and brush on stuff. Because my hammerite is brush apply kind stuff.

Janne

I haven't seen that at all. Who makes it?

The difference would be that conceivably you would have less airborne fumes and propellant and it might be easier to keep it neat and not make a mess inside the house. It would probably be the better solution for you if you are going to try to paint inside, i'd say. Still, ventilation is very important.

-chris

jpm83

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2008, 01:34:33 PM »
Is there any difference between that spray on stuff and brush on stuff. Because my hammerite is brush apply kind stuff.

Janne

I haven't seen that at all. Who makes it?

The difference would be that conceivably you would have less airborne fumes and propellant and it might be easier to keep it neat and not make a mess inside the house. It would probably be the better solution for you if you are going to try to paint inside, i'd say. Still, ventilation is very important.

-chris

I,m going to use this kind of Hammerite it's made by Finnish paint company called Tikkurila.
http://www.tikkurila.fi/kotimaalarit/tuotteet/tuotteet_ulkomaalaukseen/metallipinnat?C=515&product_id=175

Janne

jpm83

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2008, 01:49:24 PM »
BTW you should be careful with those chemicals, because they may trigger your chickenpox virus which is at sleep in your body. I found this link to the decease that I had. There is some quite HC pics so if you're sensitive don't click the link. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herpes_zoster

Janne

Sir_Ian

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2008, 02:43:26 PM »
This may come off as a really stupid thing to say, but even though it is -15 degrees outside, maybe you should still spray it out there. This way you only have to deal with the fumes actually coming off your project, and not any of the excess fumes that will float away outside ripping our O-Zone into swiss cheese!  ;D
Now these excess fumes won't be lingering in your bathroom.

Just set some newspaper out on your front porch run out there and spray it in 35 seconds, and bring it inside, and let it dry in your bathroom with the window open and the fans a blowing.

Even a better suggestion. I live in a desert and its been about 50 degrees out. What I have been doing for spraying is leaving it in the garage near the garage door with the door partly or wholely open. Have any friends with a garage?  Ask them if you can leave it at their place.
Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.

jpm83

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2008, 02:59:22 PM »
This may come off as a really stupid thing to say, but even though it is -15 degrees outside, maybe you should still spray it out there. This way you only have to deal with the fumes actually coming off your project, and not any of the excess fumes that will float away outside ripping our O-Zone into swiss cheese!  ;D
Now these excess fumes won't be lingering in your bathroom.

Just set some newspaper out on your front porch run out there and spray it in 35 seconds, and bring it inside, and let it dry in your bathroom with the window open and the fans a blowing.

Even a better suggestion. I live in a desert and its been about 50 degrees out. What I have been doing for spraying is leaving it in the garage near the garage door with the door partly or wholely open. Have any friends with a garage?  Ask them if you can leave it at their place.

That my paint was brush on type. I'm currently studying to be a professional musician and all my friends here are other students from my school so their living arrangements are quite the same than my.

Janne

jpm83

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2008, 04:56:08 PM »
I started to make a test. I opened the paint can and left it in my bath room. If it starts to smell in my flats other room I will know how bad the fumes will be. The advantage of this experiment is that if it gets too bad I can always put the lid back on to the jar.

Janne

jpm83

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2008, 05:01:05 PM »
BTW it smells like turpentine.

Janne

John Lyons

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #13 on: February 16, 2008, 05:40:04 PM »
If you have the paint on (brush) kind it will not be too bad. Open the window a little and turn on the vent fan.
Or see if there is any place else you can paint it and then bring it in to dry.

John

Hammertone!!

Basic Audio Pedals
www.basicaudio.net/

jpm83

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #14 on: February 16, 2008, 06:27:10 PM »
So far the smell have stayed in the bathroom. Great looking build you got there John. Thanks for all the replies.

Janne


Hanglow

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2008, 06:26:17 AM »
does hammerite need an undercoat? or can it just go straight on?

jpm83

Re: Yet another Hammerite question.
« Reply #16 on: February 17, 2008, 10:04:34 AM »
I think it doesn't need any prime coat. Because back in the day when I was in school, we had kind of introduction to work life week and I was in the shop of an local blacksmith. We painted all steel camp fire bases with that stuff and didn't use prime there.

Janne