Author Topic: New Sensor enclosures...  (Read 2351 times)

cpnyc23

New Sensor enclosures...
« on: August 25, 2008, 01:54:46 PM »
I don't know about the rest of you, but I'm fed up.  Since I only do one-off projects, I think I'm done with New Sensor enclosures.  I'd rather spend the extra few bucks on a Hammond and not waste at least 3 hours of a Saturday afternoon sanding and sanding and sanding....  Even after going through 100, 220, 400, 600 & 1200 grit my New Sensor enclosures are riddled with little nicks and dings.

With Hammond enclosures, what few dings are there actually come out.  And they aren't covered in a thick layer of nasty metal dirt.

That's all - I just had to rant

-chris
"I've traveled the world and never seen a statue of a critic."    -  Leonard Bernstein

John Lyons

Re: New Sensor enclosures...
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2008, 07:45:04 PM »
Are you painting of etching the boxes?
If you are painting just start with 80 grit and you can take out most of the pits.
I usually do 80, 120 and then a couple coats of self etching primer which makes all the difference.
Just sand the primer fine which is a lot easier than sanding bare metal.

john

Basic Audio Pedals
www.basicaudio.net/

cpnyc23

Re: New Sensor enclosures...
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2008, 10:48:32 PM »
I'll have to give the self etching primer a try.  Thanks for the tip!

-chris

PS - Regardless, they are disgustingly dirty though...
"I've traveled the world and never seen a statue of a critic."    -  Leonard Bernstein

John Lyons

Re: New Sensor enclosures...
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2008, 10:55:26 PM »
The swim from China is a bit further than the walk from Canada.
I give them a good cleaning when they arrive here.  :icon_wink:

john

Basic Audio Pedals
www.basicaudio.net/

Barcode80

Re: New Sensor enclosures...
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2008, 02:21:35 AM »
start with 60 grit, you are already starting with what is considered medium to fine sandpaper to most contractors. coarse grit (60) will flatten that box in about 20 minutes. THEN go to the 100 and so on. your results should be much better.

Auke Haarsma

Re: New Sensor enclosures...
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2008, 04:51:43 AM »
Do you guys sand by hand or do you use a machine?

I'm doing it by hand because I don't have a machine, but I do consider getting one.

cpnyc23

Re: New Sensor enclosures...
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2008, 12:18:16 PM »
I'll give the coarser grit a try.  Thanks for the tips.

I've been doing it by hand but I'm seriously considering the switch to something electronic - no sense doing something the hard way if technology can help!

-chris
"I've traveled the world and never seen a statue of a critic."    -  Leonard Bernstein

Barcode80

Re: New Sensor enclosures...
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2008, 10:58:54 PM »
actually, it has been my experience that results are actually much better by hand with a sanding block. the sanding block helps you even your naturally and unavoidably uneven hand pressure. if you turn the enclosure face down on a belt sander, you can get quick results, but any slightly uneven pressure is going to give you a nice flat... slanted box top. by hand is harder, but in art and science often the harder yields more positive results.

cpnyc23

Re: New Sensor enclosures...
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2008, 11:28:50 AM »
Too true.... I was thinking that I could use a belt sander for the first round of removing the nicks.  I do use a wood block for hand sanding but I've found that when I am sanding by hand for an hour I end up slacking off (not to mention my arm gets tired!).   If I used the belt sander for the tough stuff and then hand sand for the 200 & up grit I might do a better job. 

Maybe I'll borrow one and see how it goes....

-chris
"I've traveled the world and never seen a statue of a critic."    -  Leonard Bernstein

John Lyons

Re: New Sensor enclosures...
« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2008, 11:57:09 AM »
It seems you guys are talking about sanding boxes for etching not painting?.
Granted I use hammertone paints that are applied thick so they cover and have a somewhat 3Dtextured surface.
For painting these boxes don't need all that much prep work I don't think.
A little 80 grit with an orbital sander and some hand sanding just to remove the scaled metal and it off to the primer.
Sanding sealer/primer is what you need to use to get out those pits and blemishes.
one coat to seal, sand lightly smooth and re-coat and you should be good.
Some of these boxes due have uneven tops though.... :icon_cry:

For sanding boxes just make a little jig with a small 12" piece of plywood and a couple strips to keep the box from scooting around, maybe rubber feet or some kind of pad on the bottom.
Get a rubber sanding block from the hardware store or a small but smooth dead flat piece of wood and wrap your sand paper around it.
Get busy...

For wet sanding you can get a piece of thick glass or even plexi glass and wet/dry silicon carbide paper.
Wet the paper and the glass. Put the paper on the glass face up and it will stick due to the surface tension of the water and flat surface.
Then you can sand with the box face down. Keep fresh water on the paper to flush away the particles and it will cut faster.

I have a belt sander but it is too much really. You have to use either finer paper or work on your finesse with it.
It'll eat boxes up pretty fast if you're not careful.

It also helps to screw on the bottom to flush up the sides. This way the side of the box, and lid are sanded flush together.

If you really want to get industrious you can use your old etchant to etch the box before painting. This roughs up the box just right to get the paint or primer to stick well. The "industry" does this all the time. An even etch without letting it sit too long on one place works well.

"Just though you had the right to know"  -slacker (the film)

john

Basic Audio Pedals
www.basicaudio.net/

cpnyc23

Re: New Sensor enclosures...
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2008, 02:00:49 PM »

For wet sanding you can get a piece of thick glass or even plexi glass and wet/dry silicon carbide paper.
Wet the paper and the glass. Put the paper on the glass face up and it will stick due to the surface tension of the water and flat surface.
Then you can sand with the box face down. Keep fresh water on the paper to flush away the particles and it will cut faster.


This is genius!!  I've just started using the silicon carbide paper (w/ a plastic like back).   Sticking on to a piece of plexi is the perfect solution - I don't know why I didn't think of stable paper and moving the enclosure.

John, you may just have restored my faith in less expensive enclosures!

-chris
"I've traveled the world and never seen a statue of a critic."    -  Leonard Bernstein