Author Topic: What app do you use for your pedal art (decals) so you know tha text will fit  (Read 7773 times)

Kitarist

So i'm really curious how do you measure everything up so the decal that you make for your pedal fits perfectly (text for knobs etc..)

Thanks!!!

ralley

I use Inkscape - a free vector drawing application.  I have templates for the enclosures I use as well as the components.   I can mock up the layout and get it quite realistic, then by switching on and off layers I'm left with the design to print to decal.

Rob.
Sender lawyers, guns and money
The sh*t has hit the fan.
   - Warren Zevon

GREEN FUZ

After scanning the enclosure I use photoshop to work out the graphic.

Andi

I use the eMachineshop CAD client to do the physical layout for a drilling template, then turn that into a PDF, import it into Inkscape and use the latter to position text so it's exactly aligned with the controls.

JKowalski

I don't do decals, but for etching I print out a laser printer image by:

- Measuring dimensions exactly
- Creating a oversized image with the same porportions as the measurements on photoshop
- SCANNING THE ENCLOSURE IF PREDRILLED!  Then you overlay the image onto your measure photoshop template, and line up you graphics with the holes!
- Sizing down the image in photoshop to get the IRL measurements, with a high DPI
- Putting the image in microsoft word, and putting the image size to 100% (I've had weird issues with photoshop not printing to correct sizes before, WORD works everytime)

- THE MOST IMPORTANT - PRINT OUT A TEST IMAGE. No matter how sure youare that you did everything right, you NEED to do this! Don't be %^&*y! It will save ink, and frustration. Print out your test in a low contrast high brightness B&W image, cut it out, and place it on your box. Put the knobs and everything on top of the image, and make sure its exact. If not, measure your imperfections, and correct them in photoshop.

- Print Final!

Remember, its alot less painful to check and recheck everything then to look back and say "I could have done that SO much better"

« Last Edit: May 19, 2009, 10:09:44 PM by JKowalski »

mth5044

Adobe Illustrator for making them from scratch, Adobe Photoshop if using or editing picture(s) from the internet or other pictures.

juse

Inkscape is good, its a free vector app, but be sure to save often, as it tends to crash.

You can open pdf templates with it and modify to your liking.

Here are templates for the two most popular Hammond box sizes:

Hammond 1590BB Template:
http://www.geofex.com/FX_images/hmbbtpt.pdf

Hammond 1590B Template:
http://www3.telus.net/public/david65/pedal-pics/drill-template/1590B-With-3-Pot.pdf




Greg_G

Inkscape is good, its a free vector app, but be sure to save often, as it tends to crash.

You can open pdf templates with it and modify to your liking.

Here are templates for the two most popular Hammond box sizes:

Hammond 1590BB Template:
http://www.geofex.com/FX_images/hmbbtpt.pdf

Hammond 1590B Template:
http://www3.telus.net/public/david65/pedal-pics/drill-template/1590B-With-3-Pot.pdf



They're really useful... thanks for those..

hday

I use Illustrator exclusively, except if I'm editing photos. Most of the time I'll convert the image to a vector before I use it. There are tons of free vector graphics on the internet, as well as fonts which can be easily converted to a vector and changed around.

I ususally mock up my graphics in Illustrator, making them slightly larger than the shape of the box. Then when I print them and cut them out, I dont have to worry about underprinting the sides. After I make the design, I'll print a sticker with the knob, switch and jacks marked out so I can drill them. You can also print a mockup on cardstock and place it under the nuts holding down the switches and pots, so you can see what your finished graphic will look like. Then you can change around text and shapes so they work better, like if a knob hangs over some text or something. Then reprint and try it again. Once your done, you can have your graphic printed in a super high resolution at Kinkos or something, if you want a sticker.

I've tried scanning a pre-drilled enclosure before, but I find if you're careful with your drilling, you can drill right on a test sticker and it will be almost a perfect fit. Not every time, but most times. Use a center punch and a drill press, for sure.

Hammond has PDFs on their website of all of their small enclosures, which you can import to Illustrator to design with. They're not great, but they've got the dimensions. You'll probably end up spending some time making your own layouts to the specs of the enclosures you use, which you can use over and over again. Having the Hammond PDFs really helps when trying to figure out how round the corners are, how deep the lid is, etc.

http://www.hammondmfg.com/scpg.htm

You're probably be using the 1590 series, FYI.

Kitarist

Wow thanks for all the replies :D :D

Anyway i'l just use the photoshop trick mentioned earlier i think it would be the easiest.