Author Topic: Need info - Peterman Stomp Puck  (Read 2332 times)

alparent

Need info - Peterman Stomp Puck
« on: September 25, 2014, 01:03:25 PM »
I'd like to make this: http://www.peterman.com.au/music/DIY/stomp-box-bass-transducer-pickup-student

Anybody as info that could help me?

Thanks

R.G.

Re: Need info - Peterman Stomp Puck
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2014, 02:25:46 PM »
It's fairly obvious from the pictures. You find and trap a small, but good-bass-response speaker. Then you hook an 8-ohm to high-impedance baby transducer to it, and run that to the jack. Quality will depend on the qualities of the speaker, transformer, and the box you bolt it to.

A similar thing would have been made at one time by using a twin-T oscillator that was tuned to just not ...quite... oscillate so that any disturbance would make it ring. Low fundamental frequency gives a good bass thump. Suffers from not having proportional response to how hard you hit it, but mechanically much simpler.
R.G.

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alparent

Re: Need info - Peterman Stomp Puck
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2014, 02:51:42 PM »
I figured on of those 8-ohm to 1000-ohm I got from RadioShack would do the trick.
But if you look in is site, he talks about having some kind of weight on the speaker's cone. But I was not able to see it in any pictures.
That's the part I was hopping to get information on.
I admit the rest is pretty basic. I guess my question was not clear at all!  :icon_redface:

R.G.

Re: Need info - Peterman Stomp Puck
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2014, 06:12:37 PM »
But if you look in is site, he talks about having some kind of weight on the speaker's cone. But I was not able to see it in any pictures.
That's the part I was hopping to get information on.
It was once a fairly well known trick in speaker building circles to lower the resonant frequency of a speaker by weighting the cone. The could be done a number of ways, but the simplest was to glue a circular weight very near the voice coil.

If I were doing this, I would be very tempted to glue a steel washer on the center/voice coil area of the speaker, and then to test it. You could easily enough add more weight with glue and whatever.

You'll probably use up a few speakers this way, but it's often possible to get 3-4" "mid bass" drivers cheap at some speaker places.
R.G.

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PRR

Re: Need info - Peterman Stomp Puck
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2014, 11:41:06 PM »
The classic cone-loading was:

modeling clay

solder

We didn't do steel because (on a Real speaker) it would be sucked up to the magnet (perhaps not on the weenie speaker).

Modeling clay is sure the way to start. When you get enough boom, peel the clay, weigh it, weigh out that much solder, coil it into the dome/cone valley, and glue.
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alparent

Re: Need info - Peterman Stomp Puck
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2014, 07:36:11 AM »
Thank you guys.
This is great information.


R.G.

Re: Need info - Peterman Stomp Puck
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2014, 09:37:15 AM »
We didn't do steel because (on a Real speaker) it would be sucked up to the magnet (perhaps not on the weenie speaker). 
Doh! Of course not steel. I wasn't thinking. I clearly need more coffee.

Do what Paul says - experiment with something like clay, load with something denser, but non magnetic.

I now return me to my coffee cup.    :)
R.G.

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