Author Topic: KLON Centaur / Clones Charge Pump Differences  (Read 378 times)

KLON Centaur / Clones Charge Pump Differences
« on: October 02, 2019, 08:30:43 AM »
Hi to All,

I'm starting to built my own Klon clone. I ordered the Aion Refractor PCB which is the "verified" 1:1 copy of the original circuit.

I printed the "real one" and the "refactor" schematic and I see some changes in the power section:

Here's the original:



Here's the refractor one:



As you can see the 1uf capacitor in the "refractor schematic" are 10uf, same thing with the original 47uf cap (C17)...

Why that?

Thanks so much!

antonis

Re: KLON Centaur / Clones Charge Pump Differences
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2019, 09:01:37 AM »
Different ICs..
Can't follow your signature changes, Stephen..!!
but I like what follows:
"put the coffee down, Antonis, and nobody will get hurt."
"Arggg, Jim ...."

phasetrans

Re: KLON Centaur / Clones Charge Pump Differences
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2019, 12:19:28 PM »
Different ICs..

For the general edification of people using voltage converters. Microchip makes a "high" frequency version of this, the TC7660H. You can use smaller caps, the switching frequency is out of the audio band at 120kHz.

Re: KLON Centaur / Clones Charge Pump Differences
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2019, 05:03:42 AM »
Thanks to all,

so...if I use original values with original chip I'm right?

antonis

Re: KLON Centaur / Clones Charge Pump Differences
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2019, 08:45:33 AM »
As right as you should be by using replacement chip with replacement values..  :icon_wink:
(considering both extracted from manufacturer datasheets..)
Can't follow your signature changes, Stephen..!!
but I like what follows:
"put the coffee down, Antonis, and nobody will get hurt."
"Arggg, Jim ...."

phasetrans

Re: KLON Centaur / Clones Charge Pump Differences
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2019, 11:30:22 AM »
Thanks to all,

so...if I use original values with original chip I'm right?

There's nothing magic in the circuit about this IC. It just supplies 18V by charging a cap to 9V and shoving the leg to 0V.

The original part is obsolete, and had a low switching frequency. The more modern part, with larger caps, will work better and shpuld have less ripple. Arguably the most important component choice here are the capacitors.

I suggest the TI 1044 data sheet, or the microchip 7660H data sheet for more information, and formulas to calculate ripple.