Author Topic: james/baxandall passive tone stack  (Read 3987 times)

mountianjustice

james/baxandall passive tone stack
« on: March 15, 2015, 05:07:47 PM »
   Who has used one and what did you love/hate about it. I ahve one boarded up and I really like what it does but would like to get a little more mid boost from it. I have tried the duncan tone stack calc and just cant get it to do what i want id like to be able to boost the 400hz-4khz range. I do however think that this design would be amazing for a bass guitar. Here is a schematic of the version im using.
http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah234/mountianjustice/baxandall%20tone%20stack_zpsal0laqnv.gif

samhay

Re: james/baxandall passive tone stack
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2015, 04:48:23 AM »
This might be an issue with your terminology, but you can't boost the signal with a passive tone stack.
However, you might get more of the response you want with a FMV-style 3-knob tone stack. You could always replace the 'mid' pot with a trimmer if you must have only bass and treble controls.
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GibsonGM

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Re: james/baxandall passive tone stack
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2015, 11:02:54 AM »
The other option would be something to just work on the mids, before the tone stack...Anderton freq. booster or something, to give you a mid control, followed by the James...or, something active and more able to boost AND cut...
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deafbutpicky

Re: james/baxandall passive tone stack
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2015, 01:46:13 PM »
And if you go active on the James be aware of BOOST, as boost may overdrive the following stage.
I had a stab at the active James control a while ago which I called "gyra banx" but never tested it. If you're
interested in this try a search in this forum (and only here!) ;)

mountianjustice

Re: james/baxandall passive tone stack
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2015, 03:25:46 PM »
Thanks for the info guys yeah boost the mids wasn't exactly what i was trying to say. But i did get it to do what i wanted by changing the 180k resistor in the middle of the circuit. I played around on the duncan tone stack calc and if i put a 500k resistor in place of the 180k i can get the mid spike i was looking for with both treble and bass rolled completely down i get a great spike from 400hz thru 4khz

GibsonGM

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Re: james/baxandall passive tone stack
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2015, 04:38:30 PM »
Cool. Hopefully it will work out ok...depending on the output impedance of the circuit driving it, the results might be a bit different. But I'd just try it out, see what it sounds like!
MXR Dist +, TS9/808, Easyvibe, Big Muff Pi, Blues Breaker, Guv'nor.  MOSFace, MOS Boost,  BJT boosts - LPB-2, buffers, Phuncgnosis, FF, Orange Sunshine & others, Bazz Fuss, Tonemender, Little Gem, Orange Squeezer, Ruby Tuby, filters, octaves, trems...

Renegadrian

Re: james/baxandall passive tone stack
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2015, 07:09:11 PM »
I just put a james in an amp I had to buy and modify the hell out of it, the Fender Champion 600.

The new tone stack is very good and gives a lot of different nuances, I like it!
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PRR

Re: james/baxandall passive tone stack
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2015, 08:09:07 PM »
James and Bax are two entirely different networks.

I won't quibble about James' "boost" because the James adds 10:1 of loss, so you will *always* need to put more gain in the system to to get back where you were.

> boost the 400hz-4khz range.

What both plans will NOT do is modify the midrange. They are hi-fi controls. You reference the midrange for overall loudness, and boost/cut the extremes to taste.

Technically they will "boost mids" if you cut the heck out of bass (maybe treb too) and turn-up the Volume. However this is not how you think on stage. And that's a LOT of lost gain to make-up.



Here's the thing. Straight naked steel strings are already very midrangy. Many guitarists turned to a more wide-range sound, Fender's notched mids and boosted bass/treb. Gibson built some amps with a mid-notch the player could not defeat. If your style is to a strong midrange, then you probably need something other than the classic guitar stacks.

A bass-cut (possibly steep) and a high-cut is a "mid boost" without gain loss.