Author Topic: A Tap Tempo Control Chip  (Read 58615 times)

MoltenVoltage

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #100 on: April 14, 2009, 01:02:46 PM »
Actually, that language was removed in the latest version of the datasheet.

I just downloaded your datasheet 20 seconds ago and the language is still there (see page 4):
http://www.spinsemi.com/Products/datasheets/spn1001/FV-1.pdf

Great product, by the way.

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MoltenVoltage

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #101 on: April 14, 2009, 01:05:40 PM »
Wow, I spend a day away getting a bikini wax and come back and someone has invented a tap-tempo module.

Very cool! Molten Voltage, I can see a lot of very cool uses for this, simply because I'm not hung up on tap-tempo for PT23999 delays.

I'm shall procure said device and do shameful things to it. Thanks for the device and your posts.



I checked out your website and all I can say is WOW!  That's what we've been talking about!
www.beavisaudio.com

Hopefully we will see a Beavis design in the contest!
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octfrank

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #102 on: April 14, 2009, 01:08:10 PM »
Actually, that language was removed in the latest version of the datasheet.

I just downloaded your datasheet 20 seconds ago and the language is still there (see page 4):
http://www.spinsemi.com/Products/datasheets/spn1001/FV-1.pdf

Great product, by the way.



Missed the mention of it in paragraph 2 there, will remove and upload new file later today. But, official word is that you can use the ROM code to make and sell product.
Frank Thomson
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decc

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #103 on: April 15, 2009, 12:58:45 AM »

I hope it isn't bad form posting this to another thread, but the light at the end of the tunnel is over here. :)

MoltenVoltage

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #104 on: April 15, 2009, 01:03:21 AM »

I hope it isn't bad form posting this to another thread, but the light at the end of the tunnel is over here. :)

If you have tunnel vision re the PT2399, that is.

This is still the place to post your designs for the contest.   ;D
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earthtonesaudio

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #105 on: April 15, 2009, 08:28:24 AM »
An idea for interfacing between MV-52 and PT2399:



First IC (LM2900/3900, no substitute) is a tachometer circuit that converts pulses into a DC voltage output.  Second IC converts this voltage to a current for controlling PT2399 delay time.  Might be possible to replace the diode with the transistor/current sink portion and get it down to one op-amp, but I'm not sure.  LM3900s only come in quad packages, so you still have 2 op-amps left for buffering, modulation or whatever.  Perhaps a 3-chip delay with tap tempo (not including 5V regulator)?

jacobyjd

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #106 on: April 15, 2009, 08:33:04 AM »
Well, mine is on order--however, I'm not doing anything crazy...I've been working on putting together a sequenced effect pedal for live use, and tap tempo is what will motivate it to reality :)

More an issue of necessity rather than creativity  :icon_biggrin:
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moosapotamus

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #107 on: April 15, 2009, 12:00:26 PM »
RE: MV-52

What voltage is output from pin 2 (on-off) and from pin 3 (pulse)?

Sounds like you could also refer to pins 2 and 3 as gate and trigger outputs, yes?

Thanks!
~ Charlie
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"I tend to like anything that I think sounds good."

slacker

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #108 on: April 15, 2009, 04:22:34 PM »
An MV-52 is winging its way towards me from Smallbear as we speak  ;D
Just got to think what to do with it now.

MoltenVoltage

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #109 on: April 15, 2009, 05:19:58 PM »
RE: MV-52

What voltage is output from pin 2 (on-off) and from pin 3 (pulse)?

Sounds like you could also refer to pins 2 and 3 as gate and trigger outputs, yes?

Thanks!
~ Charlie

The pin output voltages are the same as the chip input voltage which can be anywhere from 2 - 5.5 volts DC.  The schematics show 5 volts because that is what we always use in our prototypes.

Yes you could properly refer to pin 2 as a gate output and pin 3 as a trigger output.

It is important to keep in mind that the output from pin 2 switches on and off in time with the taps.  In other words, the time it stays on is equal to the time between taps, and the time it stays off is equal to the time between taps (in real-time mode).  If you need a full square wave cycle from pin 2 that is equal to the time between taps, you can ground pin 7, doubling the output frequency (1:2 mode).

It is also worth mentioning that the two outputs can be used simultaneously and sink or source 25mA each.

Please let me know if anything is unclear, and if you have any other questions.

Thanks!
« Last Edit: April 15, 2009, 06:03:01 PM by MoltenVoltage »
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moosapotamus

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #110 on: April 15, 2009, 08:40:29 PM »
Cool! 8)
I think I'm gonna try playing with a couple of these, too!

Thanks
~ Charlie
moosapotamus.net
"I tend to like anything that I think sounds good."

earthtonesaudio

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #111 on: April 15, 2009, 09:55:04 PM »
It is important to keep in mind that the output from pin 2 switches on and off in time with the taps.  In other words, the time it stays on is equal to the time between taps, and the time it stays off is equal to the time between taps (in real-time mode).  If you need a full square wave cycle from pin 2 that is equal to the time between taps, you can ground pin 7, doubling the output frequency (1:2 mode).

That's a handy bit of information.  Just add an integrator to the output and you have a triangle LFO.   :P

analogmike

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Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #112 on: April 15, 2009, 10:06:18 PM »
One thing I didn't see answered, did you have that chip custom made for you, or tweek an existing chip? Just curious as I thought it would be cost prohibitive to do that. I wish I could think of a good application we could use it for, will keep it in mind. thanks!
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MoltenVoltage

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #113 on: April 16, 2009, 01:49:37 AM »
One thing I didn't see answered, did you have that chip custom made for you, or tweek an existing chip? Just curious as I thought it would be cost prohibitive to do that. I wish I could think of a good application we could use it for, will keep it in mind. thanks!

MV-52 is a custom programmed microcontroller that we created and manufacture.

Thanks for the feedback.  Hopefully this thread and the contest will give you (and everyone else) some inspiration!


...for those new to this thread, see page 4 for contest details
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slacker

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #114 on: April 20, 2009, 03:38:33 PM »
Mine arrived over the weekend, I've only had a brief play with it, but it works as advertised :)

Hopefully in a couple of days I'll be able to knock up a simple tremolo.

nelson

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #115 on: April 20, 2009, 04:18:20 PM »
RE: MV-52

What voltage is output from pin 2 (on-off) and from pin 3 (pulse)?

Sounds like you could also refer to pins 2 and 3 as gate and trigger outputs, yes?

Thanks!
~ Charlie

The pin output voltages are the same as the chip input voltage which can be anywhere from 2 - 5.5 volts DC.  The schematics show 5 volts because that is what we always use in our prototypes.

Yes you could properly refer to pin 2 as a gate output and pin 3 as a trigger output.

It is important to keep in mind that the output from pin 2 switches on and off in time with the taps.  In other words, the time it stays on is equal to the time between taps, and the time it stays off is equal to the time between taps (in real-time mode).  If you need a full square wave cycle from pin 2 that is equal to the time between taps, you can ground pin 7, doubling the output frequency (1:2 mode).

It is also worth mentioning that the two outputs can be used simultaneously and sink or source 25mA each.

Please let me know if anything is unclear, and if you have any other questions.

Thanks!

Isn't the onternally RC generated clocking frequency of these MCU's supply voltage dependant?

As such, you probably shouldn't be advising that the MCU can run down to two volts, wouldn't that throw off the timing?
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R.G.

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #116 on: April 20, 2009, 08:38:55 PM »
One thing I didn't see answered, did you have that chip custom made for you, or tweek an existing chip? Just curious as I thought it would be cost prohibitive to do that. I wish I could think of a good application we could use it for, will keep it in mind. thanks!
From the pinout, it's probably one of the eight pin PICs or AVR uCs.
R.G.

In response to the questions in the forum - PCB Layout for Musical Effects is available from The Book Patch. Search "PCB Layout" and it ought to appear.

MoltenVoltage

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #117 on: April 21, 2009, 12:10:51 AM »
RE: MV-52

What voltage is output from pin 2 (on-off) and from pin 3 (pulse)?

Sounds like you could also refer to pins 2 and 3 as gate and trigger outputs, yes?

Thanks!
~ Charlie

The pin output voltages are the same as the chip input voltage which can be anywhere from 2 - 5.5 volts DC.  The schematics show 5 volts because that is what we always use in our prototypes.

Yes you could properly refer to pin 2 as a gate output and pin 3 as a trigger output.

It is important to keep in mind that the output from pin 2 switches on and off in time with the taps.  In other words, the time it stays on is equal to the time between taps, and the time it stays off is equal to the time between taps (in real-time mode).  If you need a full square wave cycle from pin 2 that is equal to the time between taps, you can ground pin 7, doubling the output frequency (1:2 mode).

It is also worth mentioning that the two outputs can be used simultaneously and sink or source 25mA each.

Please let me know if anything is unclear, and if you have any other questions.

Thanks!

Isn't the onternally RC generated clocking frequency of these MCU's supply voltage dependant?

As such, you probably shouldn't be advising that the MCU can run down to two volts, wouldn't that throw off the timing?

Good questions.

Actually, the processor speed is relatively consistent (+/- 5%) across the specified voltage range (2 - 5.5 volts DC) and a very wide range of temperatures (-40 to +185 deg. Fahrenheit)

In addition, the timing is not absolute, but relative to the tap interval, therefore any processor speed variations make no difference.

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Nasse

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Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #118 on: April 21, 2009, 02:00:54 PM »
I hope Mr Standard reads this. Or perhaps manufacturers start to make tap pedals wit external / aux input and ouput for that stupid tap signal.
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puretube

Re: A Tap Tempo Control Chip
« Reply #119 on: April 26, 2009, 06:52:19 PM »

A few thoughts about the FV-1.  First of all, it is very very cool and packs a lot of customizable digital effects in a small package.  If you actually read the datasheet, it says "8 demonstration programs are built into the internal ROM...The default ROM programs are for demonstration purposes and should not be used in production".  In other words, don't even think about selling pedals with it unless you write your own custom code using their assembly language.

Actually, that language was removed in the latest version of the datasheet. It was there originally as the ROM code was created prior to having actual chips, and while I tested the code in the Verilog simulator we could only do short audio tests (I was simulating the FV-1 in Verilog and it may take an hour to simulate 100mS, so it took days to simulate a few seconds) and we didn't want people to design product around the ROM programs then discover an error later. But as Spin is confident with the code, feel free to build products using the ROM code, sell them, make a profit, all fine with Spin!

Thanks for clearing this up loudly and in public, Frank!  :icon_biggrin: :icon_wink: :icon_cool: